“A salute to sea life as it was in the Gulf of Mexico”



An underwater tour of the Gulf of Mexico by submarine and scuba, highlighting the vast diversity of marine life throughout the Gulf, from the surface to depths of nearly 2,000 feet. The tour begins in the northern Gulf, tracks south along the west Florida shelf, to northwestern Cuba and finally west to Veracruz, Mexico. This video was produced for the opening ceremony of the first “State of the Gulf of Mexico Summit” held in 2006 in Corpus Christi, Texas.

This video was also shown at the May 19, 2010 U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, “Deepwater Horizon: Oil Spill Prevention and Response Measures, and Natural Resource Impacts” as part of the testimony of Dr. Sylvia A. Earle.

Chair and Program Coordinator, Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies and a marine biologist Sylvia Earle has been an explorer-in-residence at the National Geographic Society since 1998. Named “Time” magazine’s first “hero for the planet” in 1998, Earle has pioneered research on marine ecosystems and has led more than 50 expeditions totaling more than 6,000 hours underwater. She was the former chief scientist for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
Resource
Video
courtesy of YOUTUBE.com/1planet1ocean

For more on the Gulf of Mexico http://1planet1ocean.org and http://oceandoctor.org

“”Glimpses of hope for our endangered ocean life”


Using the camera to share a message of hope for the resilience of our oceans, Brian Skerry’s labor of love has been telling the stories of the ocean for thirty years. His images and words covey his deep love and respect portray for endangered wonders of the ocean life, but convey his message of hope, the timeliness, and  relevance.

Brian usually lives amongst his subjects for eight months of the year in the field,  enduring extreme conditions to capture the complete story of his beloved wildlife above and below the sea. He has lived on the bottom of the sea, spent months aboard fishing boats and dived beneath the Arctic ice to get his shot. He has spent over 10,000 hours underwater.

Brian Skerry has been a photographer for National Geographic Magazine since 1998.

“Thank you for your timeless awesomely beautiful, tender portraits of some of the oceans most endangered creatures as seen in  the photographs you shared at the TED presentation.”  (Click link )

- Mother Nature

Resource


Video
courtesy of TED.com and YOUTUBE,com

Image courtesy of National Geographic and Brian Skerry

“Why not try the hair booms now?”


Remind me why we are not using these hair booms with the oil flooding the Gulf?
Check out this experiment in the video showing the absorption of oil by conventional booms and the hair boom.

We could hold cut-a-thons across the US thousands would gladly donate to this worthy cause.
With dead dolphins washing on shore time to act.

Resource
Video
courtesy of YOUTUBE.com

“Saving endangered wildlife in the Gulf from future destruction”


The once beautiful rare sea turtle is covered in the Gulf of Mexico’s oil. this one is one of the lucky ones that survived to find the caring hands of a wildlife team. It was forced to fight its way through miles and miles of toxic oil. The nesting season for threatened and endangered sea turtles has just begun.  The oil has made its way to the loop current that can take it has far as the east coast where the southern migration of the sea turtles from New England to the Caribbean is underway.

These turtles are precious, and Defenders of Wildlife and its consorioum going to go to court to court to save them.

Please donate now to support our efforts in the courts, on Capitol Hill and on the ground to save sea turtles and other imperiled wildlife.

For years, the federal government has been issuing “categorical exclusions” to help fast-track oil and gas exploration and drilling in the Gulf of Mexico – effectively priming the pump for the massive oil slick now jeopardizing the survival of threatened and endangered sea turtles and other wildlife.

Just last week, Defenders of Wildlife and their associate groups called on the Senate to pass legislation to address climate change and the sea level rise that threatens to devastate sea turtle nesting ground without providing incentives for more dangerous offshore drilling.

On Monday May 17, Defenders filed suit in federal court to stop the federal government’s continued use of these “categorical exclusions” and demand an end to the cavalier disregard for the disastrous impact that offshore drilling and exploration can have on sea turtles and other imperiled species.

Your support for the court fight ahead is needed by Tuesday May 25th.

Thank you for your caring and generous contribution.

Kemp’s ridley and loggerhead sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico are just now beginning to nest on the beaches where they lay their eggs each year. These and other endangered sea turtles are found throughout the coastal and offshore waters of the Gulf.

Resources
Excerpts courtesy of secure.defenders.org
Image courtesy of twitpic.com/1p7jqz

“Oceans our life”


As the Obama administration was approving the disastrous BP drilling, it was also lifting the decades-long, nationwide moratorium on new offshore oil drilling. It plans to push similarly dangerous oil rigs into Alaska, the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Coast from Maryland to Florida.
Here are some reasons presented by we should protect the ocean and all are waterways.

Fifty years ago the ocean was pristine and balance place to live. Sylvia Earle pleads with us to save our life by saving our oceans and waterways. The ocean is on life support. We have dumped and polluted , over fished and caused the warming of the ocean the heart of the earth.

Ninety percent of the big fish in the sea are gone in fifty years! We have only protected .8 percent of our oceans as National or International Marine Reserves.

"> Listen to Sylvia as she helps us find ways to protect our water, fish and all sea life.

Part of helping save our oceans is to protect them from reckless drilling. Our government must be encouraged to move in this direction.  Interior Secretary Ken Salazar proudly boasted, it will be the biggest expansion of offshore oil drilling in 30 years over the next ten years.

We have to take action right away. Make a special emergency donation now to our new Gulf Disaster Fund.

Please make a special, emergency donation today to our Gulf Disaster Fund.

Thank you for this generous emergency contribution.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of Center for Biological Diversity

Video courtesy of  ted.com

“Angels Great Barrier Reef workn’ overtime”


The best offense is a good defense. If the reefs of the world are to survival global warming and the threats from pollution, ships run aground, tourism, overfishing being proactive is critical.

Allowing ships to travel unescorted through the most environmental diverse area on the planet is careless at best. When these ships are carrying toxic materials it is plain irresponsible.

Information now suggests that the now pilot of the Shen Neng fell asleep at the wheel or is their possible foul play happening here.

When the ship ran up onto the Great Barrier Reef, it sat there for days before its oil was drained.  That began today. Its coal is still on board. The oil spill that happened right after the accident.
The “angels of the reef” must be working overtime to diminish the devastating effects of this spill. May Mother Nature rise again stronger and healthier than it was prior to the accident.
Resources
Excerpts
courtesy of   http://bit.ly/bvKpRS

Video of wreck http://bit.ly/d3TulZ

Image courtesy of   http://bit.ly/c3qhsd

“Poaching +aphrodisiacs + greed + ignorance = the ‘blood diamonds’ of species survival”


You may be seeing the last of these species

It seems even those we pay to protect our animals make more money poaching than caring for the future of animals in their country. Zimbabwe security forces poached 200 rhinos during these past two years. Ivory is worth more now than gold on the black market. They are not alone.

As terrible as this is, we are supporting this behavior every time we purchase something made from ivory, tiger aphrodisiacs or wear a fur pelt from some skinned animal, go hunting for sport or chop up our forests or lands to plant non sustainable crops, build nuclear plants or drill into the sea bed for oil.

Only we can create a new healthier world.

Why do we bother to try to save endangered animals on one hand

– we wipe them out with the other?

Is there president for continuing to work with animal populations that have very few members thus limiting their genetic pool? Especially when “the blood diamond effect” is so pervasive? Why is the gene pool diversity needed?

As current genetic knowledge has it, the more diverse the number of genes contributing to the reproductive pool the stronger the chance that healthy, genetically strong traits to be passed down to offspring insuring the survival of the species.

Many of our most well known animals like the South China tiger, the orangutan, the Sumatran elephant and rhino, the panda, the tortoise, many of the whales, the sea turtles, the cheetah, monarch butterfly, pacific salmon, the North American bears, the wolf, jaguar, sharks, tuna, hundreds of frog, toad and other amphibians… are a few of thousands of animals and plants destroyed along the way to the bank or for aphrodisiacs or to make homes by slashing and burning or long lining their lives to the brink of extinction.

As the blood diamond, the African diamond mined at the expense on the backs of the blacks in the mines of South Africa, so to is the ivory horns, tiger penis, animal pelts, turtle shells and eggs, shark fins, roe of fish, palm oil, illegal animal trade , over fishing, etc are the bloody diamonds rampant in modern society.

Should we try to save an endangered species?

Junaidi Payne chairman of the Borneo Rhinoceros Alliance (BORA) and longtime conservationist with WWF (World Wide Fund for Nature), Malaysia answers this question this way, “There are estimated to be 11,000 orangutans [in Sabah alone] and probably 1,500 [Bornean pygmy] elephants, but there are no more than forty rhinos… New populations have stagnated and are going down slowly. It’s about need.

Bornean rhino probably has only 6-7 fertile females. MAYBE THEY CAN BE SAVED.

It is the maybe that keep us going against all odds as explorers of old trying to cross Antarctica and the success stories along the way like the miracles from medical field. Against all odds and commonly held genetic theory some will survive and flourish outside of captivity in their natural habitat. We can do it.

Intensive conservation measures pulled the white rhino back now about 17,480 white rhinos live in east and southern Africa and are the most populous rhino species in the world. Rewilding of the tigers in China is under way trying to help the South China tiger’s numbers. We cannot give up on our world.

Life in all forms is too precious.

Thanks to everyone who loves enough to give their time, energy and money to save our world. Everyone can help become a Crusader for Nature.” – Mother Nature

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of  http://news.mongabay.com/2009/1201-hance_tam.html

Excerpts courtesy of  http://bit.ly/bEKRms

Image courtesy of  http://www.ens-newswire.com/20090716_rhinopoaching.jpg

Image courtesy of  http://english.people.com.cn/200605/24/images/tiger1.jpg


“Coral reefs are the world’s underwater rainforests”


Coral are the rainforest of the ocean. Its reefs quickly create new species. The biodiversity of life on the reef is comparable to the multiplicity of life forms in the rainforests. There are 30 of 34 known animal phyla living on the reef. About 2800 species of fish are known to live in the reef region. Of the 500 or so species of reef building corals found throughout the Indian and Pacific Oceans, about 350 are known to be on the Barrier Reef. It could be decades before scientists have a complete list of all the plants and animals found on any one reef. Many species are still to be identified and named. Preserving and nurturing the coral will protect the entire food chain and our web of life as we know it.

In the richest of all regions of coral reef development (central Indo-Pacific), a single acre of coral reef habitat may harbor many types of marine algae, hundreds of brightly hued fish species, and thousands of different kinds of invertebrate animals. Coral reefs are the largest living structure on the planet.

500 million years ago the first coral reef grew. Now the world’s coral reefs are in crisis

The economic importance of maintaining a healthy coral and pollution free coastal shoreline cannot be under estimated:

1. Coral reefs cover are home to 25% of all marine fish species.
2. 500 million people rely on coral reefs for their food and livelihoods.
3. Coral reefs form natural barriers that protect nearby shorelines from the eroding forces of the sea, thereby protecting coastal dwellings, agricultural land and beaches.
4. Coral reefs, protect parts of Florida from be submerged.
5. Medicines made coral have been used in the treatment of cancer, HIV, cardiovascular diseases and ulcers.
6. Corals’ porous limestone skeletons have been used for human bone grafts.
7. It is estimated that coral reefs provide $375 billion per year around the world in goods and services.

Threats to the world’s coral reefs include:
1. Pollution -waste products from gasoline and oil, trash, plastic, cans, bottles, cosmetics, human carelessness, agriculture waste run off
2. Disease – bacterial, white pox, band and rapid wasting disease, coral bleaching, shedding – a sick environment equals sick coral
3. Over-fishing -destroying the food chain by taking all the largest fish and other sea creatures
4. Dynamite and cyanide fishing  especially in the Far East -Indonesia, Phillipines, Malasia, China, Japan
5. Sedimentation – muddy freshwater enters the sea by realizing that gaps in continuous fringing and offshore reefs faced the river mouths.
6. Bleaching caused by rising ocean temperatures from global warming

Healthy coral

If the present rate of destruction continues:

a. 70% of the world’s coral reefs will be destroyed by the year 2050.
b.  25% of coral reefs have already disappeared and an estimated two-thirds of all coral reefs are at risk today.1
c. 88% of the reefs in Southeast Asia – the most species rich reefs on earth – are at risk.
d. Since 1975, more than 90% of the reefs in the Florida Keys have lost their living coral cover.

Only we can change this destruction

  1. Take care and help clean up the our streams, shores, ocean and all waterways.
  2. Decreasing our carbon footprint
  3. When diving being respectful of the environment and staying off the coral.
  4. Take pictures of coral for souvenirs.
  5. Refusing to buy fish that are harvested by in long lines, dynamiting or cynanide poisoning ( the last two methods are from the Far East).
  6. Recycle, reuse and take trash home for proper discard on land, lake , stream, the seashore or ocean.

Support organizations that are helping protect the coral reef and sealife. Get involved.

Coral reefs are a world treasure. Our economic and health depend on them staying healthy.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of  http://www.terradaily.com//Coral_reefs_quickly_create.html

Excerpts courtesy of  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southeast_Asian_coral_reefs

Excerpts courtesy of  http://www.barrierreefaustralia.com/great-barrier-reef-info2.html

Excerpts courtesy of   http://www.nature.org/joinanddonate/rescuereef/explore/facts.html

Image courtesy of  http://images.google.com/foodweb

Image courtesy of  http://www.uncwil.edu/bio/images/JRPBahamasspongesandcoral.jpg

“Why must we save these endangered animals and forests?”


Our future as a species may be tied to saving these animals and forests from extinction.

Besides the beauty and the uniqueness of these ancient animals and forests, scientists are finding that
1. Leatherback turtle blood clots quickly so sharks can not detect their scent after being injured. This  may help scientists unravel clues to stem bleeding in humans. After surgery or injury, bleeding can cause death if not quickly stopped.

2. Cheetah’s are the fastest land animal. Their muscle protein structure may help understand their speed and help in muscle rehabilitation after an accident.

Cheetahs may run free in India

3. The naked mole rat is being studied for his longevity and extended family structure.

4. Leatherback turtles, the biggest species of turtle, can dive deeper than other turtles, leading experts to wonder how they regulate buoyancy. That and the shape of their shells could give clues to submarine or ship design.
5. Honey bee sting is used to decrease pain in joints from arthritis.
6. Frogs and lizards feet and a spider’s webs are being studied for their stickiness and its strength.
7. Tropical forests soak up greenhouse gases and are the treasure house for plants used to heal and a new source of income for poor nations.

Conserving endangered animals, sea life, the oceans, wetlands, forests and the air we breathe may take on such economic value that we will do whatever it takes to save them and us.

Resources


Excerpts
courtesy of   http://www.reuters.com

Images 1 and 3. courtesy of Nature’s Crusaders library

Image 2. courtesy of   http://costaricanconservationnetwork.wordpress.com/leatherback.jpg

“Lime in the coconut -no it is an octopus!”


Nature’s Crusaders welcomes the first cephalopod Amphioctopus marginatus to use a tool. Not like a hammer,  but this octopus adopts coconut shells from the muddy shallow sea bottom and makes itself a portable home by putting one shell below its body and one or more above it . Then it anchors its body to half of the coconut shell below by suction.

With its legs extended over the bottom shell, the octopus proceeds to tip toe across the muddy bottom on its eight legs. The Coconut Octopus would be more vulnerable to predators in shallower waters, so it carries these shells for protection and camouflage.
To see this amazing octopus in action click here.

Resources


Excerpts
courtesy of  National Geographic

Excerpts courtesy of  http://blogs.discovermagazine.com

Image courtesy of   http://wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/Octopus_marginatus.jpg

Video courtesy of  http://www.youtube.com

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