“Why not try the hair booms now?”


Remind me why we are not using these hair booms with the oil flooding the Gulf?
Check out this experiment in the video showing the absorption of oil by conventional booms and the hair boom.

We could hold cut-a-thons across the US thousands would gladly donate to this worthy cause.
With dead dolphins washing on shore time to act.

Resource
Video
courtesy of YOUTUBE.com

“Operation Blue Rage is well under way in the Mediterranean Sea”


The Atlantic bluefin tuna is on the brink of extinction because of overfishing and illegal fishing to feed a rapidly expanding market in recent years for sushi and sashimi, mainly in Japan, but also increasingly in the United States and Europe. Overall, Atlantic bluefin tuna stocks have declined by over 85 percent compared to maximum historical stock levels.

bluefin-tuna critically endangered

The legal quota for this fishing season is 13,500 tons worldwide.The  European Union fishermen quota is 7,113 tons. Spain has been allocated 2,526.06 tons, France has been allocated 2,021.93 tons, and Italy has been allocated 1,937.50 tons.

Possibly, four times this amount will be taken with the illegally with three quarters falling into the hands of poachers.

Possibly, four times this amount will be taken with the illegally with three quarters falling into the hands of poachers.

Sea Shepherd’s focus is to stop illegal fishing operations and protect wildlife.

Sea Shepherd France President Lamya Essemlali has been the co-organizer for Sea Shepherd’s Operation Blue Rage in the Mediterranean, along with Sea Shepherd Netherlands Director Laurens De Groot, a former Rotterdam police officer.

The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society plans to have the Steve Irwin their flag ship in the Mediterranean until mid-July addressing this crisis facing the bluefin tuna.



Resources

Excerpts courtesy of  seashepherd.org

Excerpts courtesy of  worldwildlife.org/WWFPresitem.html

Image courtesy of  advocacy.britannica.com/blog/bluefin-tuna

“Saving endangered wildlife in the Gulf from future destruction”


The once beautiful rare sea turtle is covered in the Gulf of Mexico’s oil. this one is one of the lucky ones that survived to find the caring hands of a wildlife team. It was forced to fight its way through miles and miles of toxic oil. The nesting season for threatened and endangered sea turtles has just begun.  The oil has made its way to the loop current that can take it has far as the east coast where the southern migration of the sea turtles from New England to the Caribbean is underway.

These turtles are precious, and Defenders of Wildlife and its consorioum going to go to court to court to save them.

Please donate now to support our efforts in the courts, on Capitol Hill and on the ground to save sea turtles and other imperiled wildlife.

For years, the federal government has been issuing “categorical exclusions” to help fast-track oil and gas exploration and drilling in the Gulf of Mexico – effectively priming the pump for the massive oil slick now jeopardizing the survival of threatened and endangered sea turtles and other wildlife.

Just last week, Defenders of Wildlife and their associate groups called on the Senate to pass legislation to address climate change and the sea level rise that threatens to devastate sea turtle nesting ground without providing incentives for more dangerous offshore drilling.

On Monday May 17, Defenders filed suit in federal court to stop the federal government’s continued use of these “categorical exclusions” and demand an end to the cavalier disregard for the disastrous impact that offshore drilling and exploration can have on sea turtles and other imperiled species.

Your support for the court fight ahead is needed by Tuesday May 25th.

Thank you for your caring and generous contribution.

Kemp’s ridley and loggerhead sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico are just now beginning to nest on the beaches where they lay their eggs each year. These and other endangered sea turtles are found throughout the coastal and offshore waters of the Gulf.

Resources
Excerpts courtesy of secure.defenders.org
Image courtesy of twitpic.com/1p7jqz

“Oceans our life”


As the Obama administration was approving the disastrous BP drilling, it was also lifting the decades-long, nationwide moratorium on new offshore oil drilling. It plans to push similarly dangerous oil rigs into Alaska, the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Coast from Maryland to Florida.
Here are some reasons presented by we should protect the ocean and all are waterways.

Fifty years ago the ocean was pristine and balance place to live. Sylvia Earle pleads with us to save our life by saving our oceans and waterways. The ocean is on life support. We have dumped and polluted , over fished and caused the warming of the ocean the heart of the earth.

Ninety percent of the big fish in the sea are gone in fifty years! We have only protected .8 percent of our oceans as National or International Marine Reserves.

"> Listen to Sylvia as she helps us find ways to protect our water, fish and all sea life.

Part of helping save our oceans is to protect them from reckless drilling. Our government must be encouraged to move in this direction.  Interior Secretary Ken Salazar proudly boasted, it will be the biggest expansion of offshore oil drilling in 30 years over the next ten years.

We have to take action right away. Make a special emergency donation now to our new Gulf Disaster Fund.

Please make a special, emergency donation today to our Gulf Disaster Fund.

Thank you for this generous emergency contribution.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of Center for Biological Diversity

Video courtesy of  ted.com

“Something is wrong with this picture- Gulf oil spill”


Toxins, dispersant, delays and red tape and let us see if we can create the magic bullet now…

If a doctor waited to learn how to repair a broken leg until a patient came in with a broken leg, he would be sued for incompetence and jailed.

Why is it that oil (or mining) companies can wait to build something that might help protect the ocean and its creatures  until after the disaster happens?

And no matter what they are now building or new technique they may be try to use congress must approve it!

The lack of efficiency of our US disaster relief system appalls me.


How many ways we can create more chaos in the Gulf-things being tried:

This is not a research project mate if you drill into Mother Earth and extract toxic gas and oil then you should now how to control and clean up your messes.

  • spreading the dispersant and at depths of 5,000 feet (1,524 meters) has never been tried
  • BP has already dispatched 3,000 gallons of the dispersant, which they are expecting to arrive in the Gulf of Mexico soon, but the proposal is still awaiting final governmental approval. Time to evaluate-haven’t you had decades?
  • Skimmers surround the oil floating on the ocean surface, but poor weather will halt their operation
  • Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) are  being deployed underwater to monitor the situation at the blowout preventer (BOP) and wellhead. The wellhead it seems has a history of leaks.
  • BP now wants to get better picture or imaging techniques and improved ROVs available for the cleanup effort.
  • A new  relief well and the three collection domes (still under construction), may be used to encapsulate the leaking oil and funnel it to a waiting ship on the surface.
  • The Materials Management Service has given permission to begin drilling the relief well. Drilling will likely be initiated within 48 hours.

Resources

Excerpts and Image courtesy of http://bit.ly/byxx85

“Louisiana’s oil spill came at the worst time”


Louisiana’s oil spill came at the worst time possible nesting season.

This is migration, spawning and nesting time for migratory song bird, endangered brown pelican and upwards of 25 million birds a day transit the region in their northern migration. More than 70 percent of the country’s waterfowl frequent the gulf’s waters, including the brown pelican, which is in its nesting season on Breton Island, in the spill’s projected path. That population of birds is still recovering from a previous oil spill that devastated the population.

How many will animals will we lose this time?

Federally protected marine mammals including the endangered whales, dolphins and all species of sea turtles are at the greatest risk. A pod of sperm whales has been sighted near the spill but has so far avoided the area. Endangered sea turtles are more vulnerable to nest they swim to shore to lay eggs on protected beaches.

No animal is safe from being coated with oil as they rise to the surface to breathe. Unable to breathe or by eat uncontaminated sea food they and their young are doomed. If feathers are covered in oil birds will starve, they will fly no more.

There seems to be way too many of these “accidents” of late.  Now BP Oil has waited far too long to begin clean up especially since 5,000 barrels of oil are pouring out into the Gulf daily.  Gulf is on fire 1800 degrees manmade fires with 1800 feet plume of toxic gases polluting even the air of the Gulf after a rupture in the well over one week ago.

Tonight (without divine intervention) it will invade the coastal wetlands.

Our government wants to open more of this drilling off the shores of our most pristine lands along the coast of Alaska and in our national parks like the Grand Canyon.

Tell your senators to forget it and develop clean sustainable energy instead or your children may not know much of the wildlife we have grown to love and admire.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/aAIi35

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/aZeT7T

Video courtesy of   http://bit.ly/9N6azh

Video courtesy of  http://bit.ly/9iNrHB


“Can we help each other like a grouper?”


Grouper excavating holes

Holes, holes everywhere, but nobody seems to be making them. Well, as maddening as that seemed to Felicia Coleman director of Florida State University’s Coastal and Marine Laboratory as she sleepily gazed at the seafloor.
Then suddenly the digger appeared. It was a red grouper.

The young grouper instinctively began clearing away the rocks, sand and debris  from around one of the sandy depressions and carrying mouthfuls of seabed dirt away.  When the hole in the ledge was large enough the fish would cosy down into its new home. These young red groupers were creating lodging for itself and other species to come later.

When they leave the hole behind, spiny lobster become the grateful next tenants.
The red grouper excavates and maintains complex, three-dimensional rock ledge structures that provide critical habitats for the spiny lobster and many other commercially important species in the Gulf of Mexico. Coleman and other researchers watched it work hard to remove sand and rocks from the sea floor, exposing hard rocks crucial to corals and sponges and the animals they shelter.
Grouper grow and move slowly, maybe that is the secret to their longevity of 29 years.
These homes sites serve to attract mates, and other beneficial species such as cleaner shrimp that pick parasites and food scraps off the resident fish. The shrimp in turn attract other predators that the red grouper like to eat. They prefer to dine at home by inhaling their food  through their gills and rapidly drawing in a current of water. Their diet includes fish, crustaceans, cephalopods like octopus and squid, plus other invertebrates.  Why move much when dinner is served to you while your lounge in comfort of your self designed hole on the sea floor?

Most abundant along Florida’s west coast, Red Grouper are found on watery ledges and in crevices and caverns from North Carolina to Brazil.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/51hinp

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/14FWCA

Image courtesy of       http://bit.ly/bPIxcS


“Coral reefs are the world’s underwater rainforests”


Coral are the rainforest of the ocean. Its reefs quickly create new species. The biodiversity of life on the reef is comparable to the multiplicity of life forms in the rainforests. There are 30 of 34 known animal phyla living on the reef. About 2800 species of fish are known to live in the reef region. Of the 500 or so species of reef building corals found throughout the Indian and Pacific Oceans, about 350 are known to be on the Barrier Reef. It could be decades before scientists have a complete list of all the plants and animals found on any one reef. Many species are still to be identified and named. Preserving and nurturing the coral will protect the entire food chain and our web of life as we know it.

In the richest of all regions of coral reef development (central Indo-Pacific), a single acre of coral reef habitat may harbor many types of marine algae, hundreds of brightly hued fish species, and thousands of different kinds of invertebrate animals. Coral reefs are the largest living structure on the planet.

500 million years ago the first coral reef grew. Now the world’s coral reefs are in crisis

The economic importance of maintaining a healthy coral and pollution free coastal shoreline cannot be under estimated:

1. Coral reefs cover are home to 25% of all marine fish species.
2. 500 million people rely on coral reefs for their food and livelihoods.
3. Coral reefs form natural barriers that protect nearby shorelines from the eroding forces of the sea, thereby protecting coastal dwellings, agricultural land and beaches.
4. Coral reefs, protect parts of Florida from be submerged.
5. Medicines made coral have been used in the treatment of cancer, HIV, cardiovascular diseases and ulcers.
6. Corals’ porous limestone skeletons have been used for human bone grafts.
7. It is estimated that coral reefs provide $375 billion per year around the world in goods and services.

Threats to the world’s coral reefs include:
1. Pollution -waste products from gasoline and oil, trash, plastic, cans, bottles, cosmetics, human carelessness, agriculture waste run off
2. Disease – bacterial, white pox, band and rapid wasting disease, coral bleaching, shedding – a sick environment equals sick coral
3. Over-fishing -destroying the food chain by taking all the largest fish and other sea creatures
4. Dynamite and cyanide fishing  especially in the Far East -Indonesia, Phillipines, Malasia, China, Japan
5. Sedimentation – muddy freshwater enters the sea by realizing that gaps in continuous fringing and offshore reefs faced the river mouths.
6. Bleaching caused by rising ocean temperatures from global warming

Healthy coral

If the present rate of destruction continues:

a. 70% of the world’s coral reefs will be destroyed by the year 2050.
b.  25% of coral reefs have already disappeared and an estimated two-thirds of all coral reefs are at risk today.1
c. 88% of the reefs in Southeast Asia – the most species rich reefs on earth – are at risk.
d. Since 1975, more than 90% of the reefs in the Florida Keys have lost their living coral cover.

Only we can change this destruction

  1. Take care and help clean up the our streams, shores, ocean and all waterways.
  2. Decreasing our carbon footprint
  3. When diving being respectful of the environment and staying off the coral.
  4. Take pictures of coral for souvenirs.
  5. Refusing to buy fish that are harvested by in long lines, dynamiting or cynanide poisoning ( the last two methods are from the Far East).
  6. Recycle, reuse and take trash home for proper discard on land, lake , stream, the seashore or ocean.

Support organizations that are helping protect the coral reef and sealife. Get involved.

Coral reefs are a world treasure. Our economic and health depend on them staying healthy.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of  http://www.terradaily.com//Coral_reefs_quickly_create.html

Excerpts courtesy of  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southeast_Asian_coral_reefs

Excerpts courtesy of  http://www.barrierreefaustralia.com/great-barrier-reef-info2.html

Excerpts courtesy of   http://www.nature.org/joinanddonate/rescuereef/explore/facts.html

Image courtesy of  http://images.google.com/foodweb

Image courtesy of  http://www.uncwil.edu/bio/images/JRPBahamasspongesandcoral.jpg

“Help the Pacific salmon have a Merry New Year”


When Mark Rockwell, our Pacific Coast Representative, retired as a doctor, he planned to spend his time fishing and guiding along the crystal clear wild rivers of the American West. As he explored these rivers, he observed first hand the dams and pollution, and saw the once mighty fisheries slipping to extinction. He realized that he had to dedicate his time to saving salmon and other endangered species.

You can help support the work of Mark Rockwell, in the Pacific Coast to protect endangered species such as the Pacific salmon, steelhead trout, red-legged frog and California condor from habitat loss and global warming. Your donation will go directly to support Mark’s work to protect endangered species and habitat.

This year, Mark led our campaign to defeat a effort in Congress that would have weakened protections for endangered fisheries in the California Bay Delta. This ecosystem is crucial to protect Chinook salmon, Green sturgeon, Delta smelt, killer whales, and many other species.

The challenges we face

Industrial agriculture, big water users and even some members of Congress oppose the Obama administration’s attempt to restore the ecosystem. Let Congress know that you want the Endangered Species Act to be enforced not only to help fisheries, but also the fishermen and local communities that depend upon them.

How one dedicated person can make a difference.

Mark helped to organize a response from fishermen, scientists, and conservationists to support strong protections for endangered species. Working with our member organizations and allies, he helped fly fishermen back to Washington DC to speak to their representatives and succeeded in convincing Congress to keep the Endangered Species Act protections in place.

Who opposes this protection?

Tea Party activists are fanning out across the country to try to attack endangered species protections again.

Join Mark’s team and help protect the wild fish and endangered animals of the Pacific Northwest.

Mark is an expert at engaging hunters, fishermen, farmers, ranchers and other people to speak out in support of endangered species protections. Here is a little bit about what people are saying about him:

“Mark Rockwell has also been on the forefront of the defense in California’s “water wars,” playing a key roll in protecting our waterways and endangered animals so that dewatering major California rivers and killing off several ESA-listed aquatic species does not take place. The once abundant Pacific salmon desperately need undammed water in the rivers to rebuild their numbers that have crashed in the last two years, putting many commercial fishing families out of business

Without the Endangered Species Coalition’s help in general, and Mark Rockwell’s in particular, the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations and many other groups’ efforts to roll back these anti-environmental bills, restore more water to California’s rivers — and to save many Pacific salmon runs from extinction — would likely have failed.”
- Glen Spain, NW Regional Director, Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations (PCFFA)

“I have come to greatly respect Mark’s work. I am a fishing equipment manufacturer and a board member of the American Sportfishing Association. I have worked with hundreds of people and organizations on fishery issues for over thirty years. I place Mark in the top tier of people I have met who can rise above the fray and get things accomplished.”
- Richard B. Pool, President, Pro Troll Fishing Equip. Company

“Working with Mark Rockwell has been a pleasure. Mark has facilitated connecting a number of grassroots networks, which has created more support for myriad efforts on behalf of fish, streams, and groundwater. Using his network again, he has increased the effectiveness of Endangered Species Coalition campaigns by locating scientists to bolster efforts to protect the Endangered Species Act. Mark’s work is essential for the numerous special status species in California.”
- Barbara Vlamis, Former Executive Director, California Endangered Species Habitats Association (CESHA)

“Dr Mark Rockwell and the Endangered Species Coalition provide essential organizing and strategic support for protecting endangered species in California. They have assisted us locally in fighting for California gnatcatchers and coastal cactus wrens on former military lands in Orange County. The Coalition has also given our group a voice on issues throughout the state, as well as inputs to federal issues of concern.”
- Dan Silver, Executive Director, Endangered Habitats League, Los Angeles, Calif.


If you would like to contact Mark to learn more about his work or to thank him for his service, you can email him at mrockwell@stopextinction.org

Without talented and experienced organizers like Mark, there would be no one to speak up for animals, birds, fish and plants on the brink of extinction. Through the Endangered Organizer Fund, you can provide valuable resources for our grassroots organizing work.

I hope you will take this opportunity to join us in supporting Mark’s work to protect endangered species

Give the gift that keeps on giving become a volunteer, lend your hand and heart and if you can your financial support to helping Mother Nature.

(Nature’s Crusaders would enjoy finding a few good writers and web and office support. Thank you -Mother Nature.)

Resources

Excerpts and Images courtesy of http://www.stopextinction.org

“Be a Dobson Fly 4 Halloween or next costume event”


The adult Dobson fly has a unique face that puts any zombie mask to shame. This critter may look like something from a horror movie, but they are beneficial insects.

Check out this illustration for unique costume possibilities for your next party or Halloween.

Mother Nature makes the best costumes or camophalage

Mother Nature makes the best costumes or camouflage

This image is the face of the Dobson fly magnified.

Dobson fly magnefied

Dobson fly head magnified

Both male and female of the eastern Dobson flies can reach lengths up to five inches (12.5 cm), measured from the tips of their pincers to the tips of their four wings, which, when not in use, are folded along the length of their walking -stick-like bodies. Their wingspans can be twice as long as their body length, and the wings themselves are densely lined with intersecting veins. Additionally, Dobson flies have segmented antennae similar to ants and wasps.

Found across the eastern side of North America east of the Continental Divide from Canada to Mexico near flowing streams where the larvae grow up. The hellgrammites are the larva and they live under stones or occasionally on snags where they feed on a variety of soft-bodied nymphs of insects like the net-spinning caddisflies and blackflies

The adults catch theri prey with the long pincers that extent out of its head. They are so strong if your finger or toe got pinched it might bleed.

Giant pinchers of Doson fly

Giant pincers of Doson fly

Dobson Fly adult

Dobson Fly adult

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dobsonfl

Excerpts courtesy of http://entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu/creatures/misc/eastern dobsonfly.htm

Image 1. (illustration) (left )courtesy of http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f6/Corydalus_cornutus_illustration.png

Image 2. (micrograph) (right) courtesy of http://i.livescience.com/images/ls_ugliest_dobsonfly_02.jpg

Image 3. (left) courtesy of http://lamar.colostate.edu/~secarney/AntCourse/133-BIG_Bug.jpg

Image 3. (right) courtesy of http://www.flytyingforum.com/uploads/gallery41c5ff989c417.jpg

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