Protect all life from the neurotoxin Imidacloprid

Protect honey bees from the deadly toxic pesticide Imidacloprid this will help the rest of us too.

img_65001 Strongly encourage EPA to BAN Imidacloprid

Send a message, before the March 17th comment deadline, telling the EPA to protect honey bees and other pollinators from high-risk uses of imidacloprid by strengthening its plans for risk, toxicity and exposure assessments.

The history of the pesticide

The EPA classifies the pesticide Imidacloprid as highly toxic to honey bees, but continues to allow its use on many crops pollinated by honey bees, including rice, cereal grains including corn, potatoes, vegetables, sugar beets, fruit, cotton, hops and turf. Imidacloprid is especially deadly when used systemically as a seed or soil treatment. This insecticide/neurotoxin is commercially known by many names like Admire, Condifor, Gaucho, Premier, Premise, Provado, and Marathon.
The importance of the bee to all life
The honey bee is the bio-indicator animal for all plant and animal species alive on earth today. Even Albert Einstein has said that if the bees die out, life as we know it will be gone in four years. The honey bee population is in serious decline, due to the colony collapse disorder (CCD), parasites and poor non-organic commercial management practices, and pesticide exposure.

Most flowering plants require bee pollination for survival. Our food crops including grains, fruits and nuts and vegetable require pollination. At least one out of every 3 plants need the help of bees to produce fruit. About $15 billion worth of crops in the United States every year are dependent on our bees.

How does Imidacloprid work?

Imidacloprid is used to control of sucking insects including rice hoppers, aphids, thrips, whiteflies, termites, turf insects, soil insects and some beetles. It works by interfering with the insect nervous system. This blockage leads to the accumulation of acetylcholine, an important neurotransmitter, resulting in the insect’s paralysis, and eventually death. It is effective on contact and via stomach action.

What other effects does Imidacloprid have?

It effects
Reproductive systems: rats and rabbit causing skeletal deformates and abnormal birth weights.
Chromosomes changes in humans effecting human lymphocytes (white cells needed for strong immune system), and also toxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells.
Organ Toxicity: thyroid lesions associated with very high doses of imidacloprid.

Ecological effects

Upland game birds, Imidacloprid is toxic.
Fish: The toxicity of imidacloprid to fish is moderately low.

Aquatic invertebrate like Daphnia it is 50% lethal and can be very toxic to other aquatic invertebrates.

Highly toxic to bees if used as a foliar application, especially during flowering, but is not considered a hazard to bees when used as a seed treatment.

Soil: It remains active in the soil for 48-190 days, depending on the amount of ground cover.
Water: In Surface water the half-life in water is much greater than 31 days at pH 5, 7 and 9, but no long term studies have been done.
Plants: Imidacloprid penetrates the plant, and moves from the stem to the tips of the plant. It disrupts the nitrogen cycle in plants. Alert for beer drinkers: There are limits for the amount imidacloprid and its metabolites on food/feed additives ranging from 0.02 ppm in eggs, to 3.0 ppm in hops. It can be phytotoxic (will kill plants) if it is not used properly.

The EPA is accepting public comments on this phase of the project through March 17th.
What you can do to make life safer for the bees and all life.

Send a message, before the March 17th comment deadline, telling the EPA to protect honey bees and other pollinators from high-risk uses of imidacloprid by strengthening its plans for risk, toxicity and exposure assessments.

Resources
Excerpts courtesy of Extension Toxicology Network (Extoxnet) lOregon State University
http://extoxnet.orst.edu/pips/imidaclo.htm

Image Natures’s Crusaders files: http://naturescrusaders.com

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