Hurdia v. looks like ancient shrimp or insect larva with a hood

Hurdia v. largest predators of the Cambrian seas

Hurdia v. largest predators of the Cambrian seas

This is a hooded ancient relative of the modern arthropods – the insects, crustaceans, spiders, millipedes and centipedes. Based on several hundred specimens of Hurdia . (Pictured at the above.) have been found in the Burgess Shale in Canada. This is an artist’s rendition of a Hurdia. The Hurdia is an ancient pre-arthropod possesses a general body architecture similar to other ancient cousins.It differs from some anomalocaridids, because it has a prominent anterior carapace structure. Anomalocaris is an ancient relative of the modern arthropods These features show clearly the diversity of known anomalocaridid structures and give us clues into the Anomalocaris is an ancient relative of the modern arthropods Trilobites the Anomalocaris (Pictured  above.) and Laggania (Depicted below.).  The presence of exceptionally well-preserved gills origins of important arthropod features, such as the head shield and respiratory structures. An Anomalocarida was between 60 cm  to 1 meter plus in length. For tens of millions of years this slow-moving swimmer dominated Cambrian seas.  It had a pineapple-ring mouth that could be used for slicing its prey and sporting a pair of long spiky grasping appendages. It used its fin-like appendages along the side of the body structure to swim with undulations motion. Laggania ancient relative of modern arthropods Another species of Anomalocarid that lived in the Cambrian period was the Laggania cambria (Pictured at left.) were filter feeder rather than but not an active predator. Its two mouth appendages had long bristle-like spines. Laggania also had short stalked eyes were behind its mouth appendages.  Laggania was probably the whale of its time. Resources Excerpts courtesy of terradaily.com Excerpts courtesy of http://www.sciencemag.org Excerpts courtesy of http://www.palaeos.com/Anomalocarida Excerpts courtesy of wikipedia.org/wiki/Laggania Excerpts courtesy of wikimedia.org/Anomalocaris Image 1. courtesy of nhm.ac.uk Image 2. courtesy of wikimedia.org/Anomalocaris Image 3. courtesy of courtesy of palaeos.com/Laggania http://alphainventions.com

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