“Dingo crusader Jennifer Parkhurst arrested for feeding starving animals”


Please show your support for Jennifer Parkhurst who has been charged with alleged feeding of Fraser Island Dingoes and faces trial 3rd of November Maryborough Magistrates Court. For 7 years she has witnessed first hand the suffering and starvation of the dingos, a major tourist attraction on Fraser Island.

igh Court of Australia decision in another case found that it was unfair for the law to place the entire burden of educating the community on the shoulders of one person.

The hope of the authorities is that by starving the dingos and jailing their  most active verbal supporter the road to more lucrative tourism can be developed.

Resources

Image 1. courtesy of    http://bit.ly/9JsoX4

Image 2. http://bit.ly/cRgh0x

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“The bug whisperer needs your help today”


Reverence It made its goal of raising $50,000 by 10/30/10   Very good news!

Reverence is a project that brings together film, music and photographs of insects in a migratory museum — a temporary structure inspired by the exquisite shape of praying mantis ootheca, or eggpod. It’s called Reverence because that is the state in which I photograph and that is what I want to communicate through my work.  

BACKGROUND

For ten years, I worked on a personal project in the brothels of Calcutta. I photographed the women, taught their children photography, helped get them into schools, made the Academy award-winning documentary, Born into Brothels, and started a non-profit organization, Kids with Cameras. For me, art is powerful; it changes lives.

Seven years ago, I began to have intense dreams of a praying mantis. Though I have always had a very strong connection to the animal world, I had no idea what this was about. I began to pay attention to the synchronicities and clues and soon enough I was following the path that Mantis had set for me.

I was led around the world, mostly camping alone in spectacular wild places — from Namibia to Botswana, to Panama, to Malaysia, to Bolivia, to Australia. I met and learned from people who hold Mantis sacred, from the bushmen elder healers of the Kalahari, to modern-day shamans and martial artists. I discovered that Mantis offers great lessons.

THE WORK

I learned how to use macro-photographic equipment, bought a pile of black and white film and began traveling. Working at night, I walk into the forest or grasslands in search of insects. Sometimes I set up lights and see who shows up. The bugs never fail to amaze me.

I ask if they want their portraits taken and if they agree, I bring them inside my tent (or cabin or camper van). I stay up all night, working for hours with each bug, making still photos and shooting HD video. Afterwards, I thank them and put them back where I found them. It is a true collaboration based on love and respect.

THE PROJECT

Reverence is a migratory museum with photographs, film and music. Reverence explores the alien or other and our intrinsic connection with the insect world. Opening December 21, 2012, in New York City, it will continue to travel to other cities around the world.

WHAT’S NEXT?

The next stage of the project is to begin work with the architect to create a concept design for the museum. A world-renowned architect is charging his minimum fee: $50,000. I am also ready to start working with a master printmaker to develop unique large-scale photographs on handmade Japanese papers.

And I need to get back into the field — to Southern Africa and to Malaysia — to continue photographing and filming these unique and wonderful creatures.

WE NEED YOUR HELP…

This project has been mostly self-funded and now I need your help and support. I want to bring people face to face with insects, to confront their fears and prejudices and to challenge them to see the world in new way. Reverence will transmit the sense of awe I feel in their presence.

In gratitude, I will keep you posted on the project’s progress, my travels and all the wonderful creatures I meet along the way. Please contact me directly if you would like to support Reverence through its production and travels, or if you would like to receive a tax-deduction for your contribution.

My work is a tribute to insects, to their intelligence, personality and elegant beauty. Please help honor the small beings who really run the planet and on whom our lives depend. Help me to bring their message to you.

May Mantis watch over you.

— Zana Briski, October 2010  Zana

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About this project

Reverence is a project that brings together film, music and photographs of insects in a migratory museum — a temporary structure inspired by the exquisite shape of praying mantis ootheca, or eggpod. It’s called Reverence because that is the state in which I photograph and that is what I want to communicate through my work.

BACKGROUND

For ten years, I worked on a personal project in the brothels of Calcutta. I photographed the women, taught their children photography, helped get them into schools, made the Academy award-winning documentary, Born into Brothels, and started a non-profit organization, Kids with Cameras. For me, art is powerful; it changes lives.

Seven years ago, I began to have intense dreams of a praying mantis. Though I have always had a very strong connection to the animal world, I had no idea what this was about. I began to pay attention to the synchronicities and clues and soon enough I was following the path that Mantis had set for me.

I was led around the world, mostly camping alone in spectacular wild places — from Namibia to Botswana, to Panama, to Malaysia, to Bolivia, to Australia. I met and learned from people who hold Mantis sacred, from the bushmen elder healers of the Kalahari, to modern-day shamans and martial artists. I discovered that Mantis offers great lessons.

THE WORK

I learned how to use macro-photographic equipment, bought a pile of black and white film and began traveling. Working at night, I walk into the forest or grasslands in search of insects. Sometimes I set up lights and see who shows up. The bugs never fail to amaze me. Check out the video clip.

I ask if they want their portraits taken and if they agree, I bring them inside my tent (or cabin or camper van). I stay up all night, working for hours with each bug, making still photos and shooting HD video. Afterwards, I thank them and put them back where I found them. It is a true collaboration based on love and respect.

THE PROJECT

Reverence is a migratory museum with photographs, film and music. Reverence explores the alien or other and our intrinsic connection with the insect world. Opening December 21, 2012, in New York City, it will continue to travel to other cities around the world.

WHAT’S NEXT?

The next stage of the project is to begin work with the architect to create a concept design for the museum. A world-renowned architect is charging his minimum fee: $50,000. I am also ready to start working with a master printmaker to develop unique large-scale photographs on handmade Japanese papers.

And I need to get back into the field — to Southern Africa and to Malaysia — to continue photographing and filming these unique and wonderful creatures.
WE NEED YOUR HELP…

This project has been mostly self-funded and now I need your help and support. I want to bring people face to face with insects, to confront their fears and prejudices and to challenge them to see the world in new way. Reverence will transmit the sense of awe I feel in their presence.

In gratitude, I will keep you posted on the project’s progress, my travels and all the wonderful creatures I meet along the way. Please contact me directly if you would like to support Reverence through its production and travels, or if you would like to receive a tax-deduction for your contribution.

My work is a tribute to insects, to their intelligence, personality and elegant beauty. Please help honor the small beings who really run the planet and on whom our lives depend. Help me to bring their message to you.

May Mantis watch over you.      Check out the video clip.

— Zana Briski, October 2010
Project location: New York, NY

or simply learn more

$1 Minimum Pledge

Receive exclusive updates about the project.

Backer 31 BACKERs

A signed buggy postcard of an original photograph by Zana and exclusive updates about the project.

Backer 29 BACKERs

A little book of bugs and a signed buggy postcard of an original photograph by Zana and exclusive updates about the project.

Backer 31 BACKERs

A signed Kids with Cameras book, a signed Born into Brothels DVD and all of the above.

Backer 39 BACKERs

A signed limited collectors’ edition of my photography book, Brothel, and all of the above.

Backer 6 BACKERs

Two VIP tickets to Reverence’s opening night (it will be well worth the wait!) plus all of the above.

Backer 5 BACKERs

A gorgeous unique 25 x 37 inch Iris bug print of your choice on handmade Japanese gampi paper, two VIP tickets to Reverence’s opening night, plus all of the above.

Backer 1 BACKER

A gorgeous unique 25 x 37 inch Iris bug print of your choice on handmade Japanese gampi paper, two VIP tickets to Reverence’s opening night, plus dinner at the restaurant of your choice in New York, Los Angeles, Johannesburg, Sydney, Kuala Lumpur or any other city I happen to be passing through on my way to find bugs. And especially good karma and blessings from Mantis!

Backer 1 BACKER

Project By

Alienmantis

zana briski

Straightpin New York, NY

I am a photographer, filmmaker, animal lover and bug whisperer. I made the Academy award-winning documentary, Born into Brothels, and founded the non-profit organization, Kids with Cameras.

Project location: New York, NY

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of    http://bit.ly/crf3Yv

Image courtesy of    http://bit.ly/9LmBLD

“Counting precious rainforest reptiles and amphibians by night”


The Field Museum team is taking inventory of a vast roadless area in Peru’s northern Amazon to explore conservation opportunities with local communities. Here is an excerpt written by Nigel Pitman of their important adventure into the Amazonian rainforest

“Up in the canopy the leaves and branches are black against a night sky that is almost blue. In the upper strata of the forest legions of stridulating insects are making a scritch-scritching chorus; to the right a far-off frog croaks once and falls silent; from the left comes an anxious-sounding hooting; a bat flutters past almost noiselessly, raising a tiny breeze; and ahead on the trail comes the rustling sound of the herpetologists searching through dry leaf litter…

When you see their yellow and the white light intersect and pause, they have found something maybe another amphibian or critter… Tonight the herpetologists end up recording 13 amphibians, three by song alone, as well as three reptiles: two geckos and a harmless, wiry little snake that for reasons of its own is dressed in the tan and brown patterns of a pit viper. The most entertaining moment of the night is when Jonh reaches into a small bromeliad on a fallen tree and plucks out three blue and yellow poison dart frogs, one after another, like clowns from a car.

Jonh Mueses-Cisneros and Rudolf von May herpetologists search during a nighttime survey along the Rio Cotuhe.

About every 10 minutes tonight they find some creature to log.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of  http://scientistatwork.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/28/a-hundred-ways-to-be-a-frog

Image courtesy of http://scientistatwork.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/28/a-hundred-ways-to-be-a-frog

“Avoid tuna and swordfish – toxic levels mercury”


This year mercury and other contaminants from Gulf tuna and swordfish are at an all time high levels according to the GotMercury.org Operation Safe Seafood project. The group has tested more than a 100 samples of supermarket tuna and swordfish for mercury levels across the country.

The mercury levels have been found in some samples to be

300% over federal mercury guidelines.

Do not eat tuna or swordfish.

Even the much consumed canned tuna has been found to contain high levels of mercury.  According to a new study, tuna accounts for over one-third of mercury exposure in the United States. To learn more please read the Operation Safe Seafood reports at www.gotmercury.org

To easily estimate your mercury exposure, go to the free online mercury-in-fish calculator at www.GotMercury.org or from your cell phone www.Gotmercury.mobi.

 

Excerpts courtesy of  www.gotmercury.org

“Chilean environmentalists want to save clean water sources and work with industry”


Saving our beautiful water, rivers, streams, lakes and oceans
Plan ahead when you still have high quality water sources -good idea Chile.

Chile’s industrial advancement has been achieved at some cost to the country’s freshwater resources but it’s only now that awareness of the impending crisis has led to calls for action, environmentalist campaigners said.
Chilean environmental campaigners want to use scientific research and a less destructive use of freshwater resources by industry. The Water Footprint Network, a non-profit organization that has headquarters at the University of Twente, Netherlands is trying to guide them.
The Water Footprint Network has been measuring Chile’s water footprint
The quantity of freshwater used in the production of a specific product in about the same way that other organizations have been monitoring the carbon footprint of consumer and industrial activities and measures the direct and indirect water use by industry.
A WFN study found that producing 1 pound of beef required 1,891 gallons of water, while a glass of beer could entail supply of more than 19 gallons of water, mostly on preparing barley for the process. More than 18 gallons of water go behind a tree producing a single apple.
Chilean lobbyists for more intelligent water use said that Chile would need to bring in new legislation to make sure water conservation and a more sensible use of fresh water resources was adhered to.
Several major institutions have already signed up to the Water Footprint Network but an overall government-led strategy is still awaited. The University of Chile, Fundacion Chile, Green Solutions consulting firms, and Concha y Toro, De Martino, and Errazuriz wineries are among institutions that have joined the campaign.

To measure your own water footprint click here.
“The water footprint … calls for companies to rethink the management of water resources,” said Rodrigo Acevedo, project manager of agribusiness at Fundacion Chile, the non-profit foundation and think thank incorporated in 1976 after agreements between the Chilean government and ITT Corporation. The foundation fosters Chilean business and industrial growth through technological innovation and implementation.
Campaigners said that studies under way in Chile could provide critical information about the water usage by specific areas and also provide incentives for the companies to participate in the studies and contribute to more intelligence uses of freshwater resources.
Officials said Chilean exports could benefit from the drive toward a fairer use of freshwater resources.
The Water Footprint Network has previously assessed the impact of industrialization in China, Germany and Britain.
To measure your own water footprint click here.

Resources
Excerpts courtesy    http://bit.ly/cCQ1Te

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/aNTWMF

Image courtesy of   http://bit.ly/9C7QbJ

“Bombing the moon for water !! “


The LCROSS mission was designed to bomb two spots in a crater on the surface of the moon’s south pole to search for water. These impacts created craters by throwing tons of debris and potentially water ice and vapor above the lunar surface. The impact released materials from the lunar surface that were analyzed for the presence of hydrated minerals to tell researchers if water is there or not.

The Shepherding Spacecraft (SS) and Centaur rocket were launched together with another spacecraft called the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). All three were connected to each other for launch, about one hour after launch, the LRO separated. The SS guided the Centaur rocket through multiple Earth orbits, each taking about 38 days.
Next the rocket separated from the SS hit the moon’s surface going more than twice the speed of a bullet. A large plume or cloud of lunar debris could be seen. As the plume rose, the SS’s cameras, took pictures of the rocket’s descent and impact into the moon and its other instruments analyzed the material . Four minutes later, the SS followed almost the exact same path as the rocket, descending down through the plume and analyzing it for water (ice and vapor), hydrocarbons and hydrated materials.

In comparison, the sands of the African Sahara are 2 to 5 percent water, and the water is tightly bound to the minerals. In the lunar crater, which lies in perpetual darkness, the water is in the form of almost pure ice grains mixed in with the rest of the soil, and is easy to extract. The ice is about 5.6 percent of the mixture, and possibly as high as 8.5 percent of it, Dr. Colaprete, the Principal Investigator for the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing (LCROSS) mission said.

When was the scientific principal of respecting new lands and environments, disturbing as little as possible abandoned?

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of   http://nyti.ms/cRTVML
Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/bKcwV8
Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/cEHo4O

Image courtesy of    http://bit.ly/91ONWj

“Give an endangered chick a home”


The African penguin is classified as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

On Dyer Island, the African Penguins would naturally burrow into the soft guano to nest. During the mid 1800’s and early 1900’s however, the guano was removed from the island and sold as fertilizer. The penguins now struggle to burrow into the hard, rocky substrate on Dyer, and have been forced to nest on the surface, leaving their eggs and chicks exposed to predation by Kelp Gulls. Cape Nature, in partnership with Dyer Island Cruises and the Dyer Island Conservation Trust, has embarked on a program to introduce artificial nests on Dyer Island, providing extra shelter for breeding penguins.

There were about 4000 pairs of penguins breeding on Dyer Island in 1959. This number increased to 23 000 pairs in 1979 (55% of the Western Cape breeding population and the largest African Penguin Colony of all). Since then it has been declining, and in 2009 there were only an estimated 1200 breeding pairs.Give a chick a home

You can help make new nests for the Dyer Island penguins Give a chick a home for the holidays.
Dyer Island trust has been established for the conservation, rehabilitation or protection of the natural environment, including flora, fauna or the biosphere, the care of wild animals; the promotion of, and the conducting of educational and training programs relating to environmental awareness, greening and clean-up projects, and conservation research.

Help build a nesting place for this penguins to improve the breeding success of the penguins and to reverse their population decline on this island.

Cost: R400.00 each (about $58 US), which goes towards nest box construction and placement, donation to Dyer Island Conservation Trust, monitoring and penguin research.

Receive: Certificate of recognition via email, penguin information, name on website, access to website updates

Give a chick a home for the holidays.

Excerpts courtesy of  http://bit.ly/cPlVdz

Image courtesy of     http://bit.ly/aPcJNt

“Victory 1-saving a critical piece of America’s Appalachian Mountains”


The Obama Administration and the EPA took a historic step last week toward protecting the people and waterways of Appalachia

by recommending the withdrawal of a permit for the largest mountaintop removal coal mine in Appalachia ever authorized, Spruce Mine No. 1.

In the history of the Clean Water Act, this could be the first veto of a project that previously received a permit.

Hooray- that’ such a critical first step victory for protection of the people, mountain ecology and the waterways.

We’ve come a long way– fighting for over a decade, standing with local leaders and organizers, through education and grassroots pressure, in the face of enormous opposition from Big Coal and industry lobbyists.

Friday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s regional administrator, Shawn Garvin, has recommended that his agency veto the Clean Water Act permit for the Spruce No. 1 Mine in Logan County, West Virginia. The Spruce mine is one of the largest mountaintop removal mines ever proposed in Central Appalachia, and would result in the destruction of 2,278 acres of temperate rainforest and the burying of 7.5 miles of streams in the Spruce Fork sub-watershed.

Our work’s not done yet – we still need to get EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson to take the final action to stop this and other mines.  But even this victory would not have been possible without the dedicated work of our members and supporters.

The Obama Administration and the EPA stepped up to the plate.  Spruce Mine No.1 would have severe impacts on the waters and the environment of local communities in West Virginia. The mine would bury more than seven miles of headwater streams and pollute water quality near the mine.
We are on our way to saving a critical piece of America’s Appalachian Mountains.  Together, we can make sure the EPA sees this through to the end and continues the push for the Obama administration to put clear, permanent solutions in place to protect Appalachia from irresponsible mining.

Support our fight to save Appalachia and transition from coal to clean energy.

 Please help us keep the victories coming by becoming a monthly  today!

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/aYjQtZ

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/dedXCj

Image courtesy of    http://bit.ly/dAxEvs

“The endangered African penguin has protection”


Good News!

The Interior Department announced last week that the African penguin will be listed as an endangered species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Thanks in large part to a legal settlement with Turtle Island Restoration Network and the Center for Biological Diversity concerning a lack of protection for the penguin.

This is great news for African penguins, who have suffered a major decline in population throughout the past several decades — a 95 percent drop since pre-industrial times.

The African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus), also known as the Black-footed Penguin, is found on the south-western coast of Africa, living in colonies on 24 islands between Namibia and Algoa Bay, near Port Elizabeth, South Africa, with the largest colony on Dyer Island, near Kleinbaai. Because of their donkey-like braying call they were previously named Jackass Penguins. Since several species of South American penguins produce the same sound, the African species has been renamed African Penguin, as it is the only penguin species that breeds in Africa. The presence of the penguin gave name to the Penguin Islands.

There are three other colonies of penguins near Cape Town at Boulders Beach, near Simon’s Town and Stony Point in Betty’s Bayand in Namibia,

The closest relatives of the African Penguins are the Humboldt Penguin and Magellanic Penguin.

Thanks to Turtle Island Restoration Network and the Center for Biological Diversity fwho are the driving forces behind the work concerning a lack of protection for the penguin.

 

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of    http://bit.ly/dnoS41

Excerpts http://bit.ly/druI7Y

Image courtesy of  http://bit.ly/druI7Y

“Will the endangered American bison only be seen on the nickel-stop the slaughter”


This iconic animal is America’s last true, wild bison.

They have survived the Ice Age, the bison massacres of the 1800s, but may not long endure the annual shameful treatment by ranchers

and especially state and federal agencies governing the care of  wild bison of Yellowstone National Park.

Saving American Bison

Help prevent the slaughter of Yellowstone bison.

Donate now to help us mobilize tens of thousands of caring people and convince federal officials to protect these iconic and majestic creatures.

Year after year the herd migrates out of Yellowstone park in search of food. At the end of winter the females will give birth, and since food is scarce un their summer breeding grounds they must find food to last through the winter.

And each year, farmers, ranchers and government officials haze them back into the park out of an exaggerated fear that these amazing animals may transmit disease to the area’s livestock.

Over 900 bison were slaughtered in 2005 – and over 1,600 in 2008!

Whenever the endangered Yellowstone bison herd gets much larger than 3,000, state and federal agencies kill them back in a twisted form of population control.

The latest bison count puts the herd at nearly 4,000, making these majestic animals particularly vulnerable this winter.

But this year can be different.

Defenders of Wildlife Action Fund is preparing to mobilize tens of thousands of activists to help prevent the bison slaughter, reaching out to new online activist communities like Change.org, Care2 and The Animal Rescue Site to build support for an end to this shameful treatment of some of America’s most treasured wildlife.

We’re also helping to secure new habitat for Yellowstone’s bison, away from those who would see them killed.

With your support, we’ll work to save more of these imperiled animals by having them moved to more bison-friendly country on the Fort Peck and Fort Belknap Indian Reservations – ensuring that America’s last true, wild bison are not isolated to Yellowstone while also helping these tribes achieve their goals to restore true, wild bison to tribal lands.

These efforts will cost money, and we’re looking to raise $20,000 by the end of the week to help launch our new campaign. Will you help us recruit new voices to prevent the Yellowstone bison slaughter and protect other wildlife?

Please donate now, so we can build a groundswell of support for Yellowstone’s bison and save these animals from slaughter.

Yellowstone’s remaining bison are a powerful reminder of the majesty of America’s natural treasures… and their history reminds us how easily our wildlife can be lost.

Please donate now and help save these amazing animals.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of http://bit.ly/9ysWqE

Excerpts courtesy of    Donate to defenders.org

Image 1. bisonlove   http://bit.ly/9nimZw

Image 2.  bison+calf http://bit.ly/bPIrzU

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