“2 rare Kangal pups join Cheetah rescue program”

New hope and more diverse bloodlines ride on these little guys,

After several years of looking for new Kangal dog bloodlines to increase its breeding program, the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) recently welcomed two Kangal puppies donated by Anne Hupel from Bonnie Blue Flag Kangals in France.  The two puppies, Firat (male) and Feliz (female), were transported from France to Namibia by Patrick Couzinet, a French CCF supporter and an active member of Leadership for Conservation in Africa, of which CCF is also a member.

 

A Kangal Dog is the national dog of Turkey. It is a domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris). Kangal, which weigh between 90-145 lb full-grown, was originally used as a livestock guardian dog. It is of an early mastiff type with a solid, pale tan or sabled coat, and with a black mask.

The breed is often referred to as a sheep dog, but it is not a herding dog, but a guardian who watches his flock with gentleness and devotion of a mother. It lives with the flock fending off wolves, bears and jackals, lions and other prey.

After several years of looking for new Kangal dogs to diversify the bloodlines in its breeding program, the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) recently welcomed two Kangal puppies donated by Anne Hupel from Bonnie Blue Flag Kangals in France to the CCF family.

The two puppies, Firat (male) and Feliz (female), were transported from France to Namibia by Patrick Couzinet, a French CCF supporter and an active member of Leadership for Conservation in Africa, of which CCF is also a member. The puppies provide new bloodlines for CCF’s successful Livestock Guarding Dog Program.  CCF is one of the few places in the world using this rare breed of dogs.

“Kangals and Anatolians are very intelligent breeds of dogs; we are very excited that the recent puppy donations will give us a greater opportunity to work with even more Namibian farmers through our Livestock Guarding Dog Program,” said CCF Founder and Executive Director, Dr. Laurie Marker.

The puppies have joined female Kangal Aleya, who arrived at CCF in September through the generosity of German breeder Kristina Peez of Sivas Guardian Angels and CCF’s resident breeding females, Cazgir from the SPOTS Foundation in the Netherlands and Hediye from Turkmen Kangal Dogs. All four puppies will be used for breeding. Having Firat, the male, will allow CCF to use natural breeding with its Kangal females. Meanwhile CCF will continue to conduct artificial insemination (AI) to increase the bloodlines of this breed with sperm donated to CCF last year by Turkmen Kangal Dogs from the US. CCF’s first successful AI was performed on an Anatolian Shepherd with sperm donated by Rare Breeds Ranch and ICSB Grass Valley, also from the US. The three female puppies born in August will also be used for breeding.

The Livestock Guarding Dog Program began in 1994, specifically to breed dogs for the protection of sheep and goat flocks when they are grazing out in the veldt and vulnerable to predator attacks.  CCF has placed more than 375 Livestock Guarding Dogs with commercial and communal farmers.

The program is open to any Namibian farmer interested in a dog.  From the initial application, CCF conducts farm visits and assesses the conditions that the dog will be living under.  Once approved, the farmers are invited to Puppy Day at CCF, where they attend courses on caring for the dogs. CCF follows up with the farmers several times during the course of the first year and once a year after that, to make sure that the dog is in good health and behaving correctly and that the farmer is happy with the dog.  In addition, during the visits CCF provides any necessary advice to the farmers, as well as basic medical care such as de-worming and vaccinations, free of charge.

If you live in Nambia

To apply for one of CCF’s Livestock Guarding Dog, please contact CCF at (067) 306 225 (Namibia only).

  • The Cheetah Conservation Fund is a Namibian non-profit trust dedicated to the long-term survival of the cheetah and its ecosystems.
  • Since 1990, the organization has developed education and conservation programs based on its bio-medical cheetah research studies, published scientific research papers and has presented educational programs to over 250 000 outreach school learners and over 1500 farmers. In addition, CCF has donated over 375 Anatolian Shepherd livestock guarding dogs to commercial and communal farmers as part of their innovative non-lethal livestock management program.
  • Research into cheetah biology and ecology has greatly increased our understanding of the fastest land animal and education programmes for schools and the farming community help change public attitudes to allow predator and humans to co-exist. However, despite the many successes of CCF programs, the cheetah is still Africa’s most endangered big cat.

For more information on CCF’s research, conservation and education programs, please contact:

Cheetah Conservation Fund
PO Box 1755, Otjiwarongo – Namibia
Tel : (067) 306225
Fax: (067) 306247
E-mail: cheetah@iway.na
Website: www.cheetah.org
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