“How are you helping Mother Earth today?”


After reading the USA Today article about the massive use of energy the Cable TV set top boxes use, I am unplugging the boxes not in use. It might make sense to put our main box on a timer since it’s only used a few hours a day?  (Anyone know?) It is time for US cable companies to step up and create equipment that supports the environment and the health of all living things.

The study found that today’s average new cable high-definition digital video recorders (HD-DVR) use more than half the energy of an average new refrigerator and more than an average new flat panel TV. Two-thirds of their total energy consumption – the equivalent annual energy output of six coal-burning power plants – occurs when they’re not in use.

In contrast, the study says cellphones are able to use extremely low levels of power when not in use, primarily to preserve battery life. It says similar innovations are beginning to appear in Sky Broadcasting’s set-top boxes in Europe and it urges pay-TV service providers in the U.S. such as Comcast, Time Warner, DirecTV, Dish Network, Verizon and AT&T to do the same. It also encourages consumers to ask providers to supply them with boxes that meet ENERGY STAR Version 4.0.

Excerpts courtesy of  NRDC   http://usat.ly/m2GTq0

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“When the snows melt”



File image courtesy AFP.

Winter is passing and there are signs that spring is coming to the northern hemisphere. But for University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) environmental chemist Torsten Meyer, springtime has a two peaked dark side.

There are two peak con­t­a­m­i­nant releases from the melt­ing snow pack: “one at the begin­ning of the melt period involv­ing water sol­u­ble chem­i­cals, and one at the end involv­ing par­ti­cle asso­ci­ated chemicals.”is the dark murky side of springtime snow melt pollution.

“During the winter months, contaminants accumulate in the snow and …when the snow melts, these chemicals are released into the environment at high concentrations.”

In a specially designed, temperature-controlled laboratory at UTSC-which includes a homemade snow-gun and a chemical pump-Meyer creates large baths of fresh snow already tainted with organic contaminants.

This one-of-a-kind set-up enables the researcher to slowly melt his “dirty” snow, collect the melt-water and track which chemicals emerge from the snow pack and when.

Meyer’s research reveal:

The spring peak contaminant flush at the very beginning of the melt,…that comes with a deluge of pollution.

When the snow turns black with muck and grime, many harmful chemicals – including those from pesticides, car exhaust, telecommunications wiring insulation, water repellent clothing, paints or coatings – may have already seeped out of the snow and into the surrounding ground water or surface water.

Challenges:

How can municipalities choose their snow dump sites to avoid the rush of pollutants?

How can aquatic organisms and amphibians, fish and invertebrates be protected are at a vulnerable stage of their life cycles during the spring snow melt flush?

Suggestions anyone?

Excerpts and Image courtesy of   http://bit.ly/f3O3x9

“EU gets gold star, bearded ladies for US”


Maine Gov. Paul LePage recently said that in a worst case scenario BPA exposure may give women “little beards.”

The European Union recently announced that it will ban six toxic substances under its Registration, Evaluation, Authorization & Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) program, reports Chemical & Engineering News. These The phase out affects three plastic softening chemicals: bis (2-ethylexyl) phthalate; benzyl butyl phthalate; and dibutyl phthalate.

The regulation also bans the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane because the compound is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic. Another affected substance is 5-tert-butyl-2,4,6-trinito-m-xylene, also known as musk xylene, which the EU characterizes as very persistent and very bioaccumulative.

The sixth chemical banned is 4,4′-diaminodiphenylmethane, used in some epoxy resins and adhesives and as an intermediate in the manufacture of other substances. The EU classifies this compound as a substance which should be regarded as carcinogenic to humans.

They are targeted because of reproductive toxicity. The EU already prohibits use of these three phthalates in children’s toys.

The landmark move, which includes phasing out three plastic softening chemicals and a flame retardant, stands in stark contrast to the U.S.’s chemical romance, particularly with the controversial chemical, Bisphenol A (BPA), a plastic additive that messes with people’s hormones and is found in levels twice as high in Americans than in Canadians. But not to worry, says Maine’s Gov. Paul LePage. The worst that could happen is that BPA exposure might cause women to start growing “little beards.”

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The European Union will phase out the use of three phthalates, a flame retardant, a synthetic musk, and a compound used in epoxy resins and adhesives. The move, announced Feb. 17 by the European Commission, marks the first time the EU has banned substances under its Registration, Evaluation, Authorization & Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) program.

Sale or use of the six chemicals will cease in three to five years unless a company obtains authorization from the commission.

To use or sell any of these substances, a business would have to demonstrate that safety measures are in place to control risks adequately or that the benefits to the economy and society outweigh the risks of using the compound.

The phase out affects three plastic softening chemicals: bis (2-ethylexyl) phthalate; benzyl butyl phthalate; and dibutyl phthalate. They are targeted because of reproductive toxicity. The EU already prohibits use of these three phthalates in children’s toys.

The regulation also bans the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane because the compound is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic. Another affected substance is 5-tert-butyl-2,4,6-trinito-m-xylene, also known as musk xylene, which the EU characterizes as very persistent and very bioaccumulative.

The sixth chemical banned is 4,4′-diaminodiphenylmethane, used in some epoxy resins and adhesives and as an intermediate in the manufacture of other substances. The EU classifies this compound as a substance which should be regarded as carcinogenic to humans.

The landmark move, which includes phasing out three plastic softening chemicals and a flame retardant, stands in stark contrast to the U.S.’s chemical romance, particularly with the controversial chemical, Bisphenol A (BPA), a plastic additive that messes with people’s hormones and is found in levels twice as high in Americans than in Canadians. But not to worry, says Maine’s Gov. Paul LePage. The worst that could happen is that BPA exposure might cause women to start growing “little beards.”

“Today’s decision is an example of the successful implementation of REACH and of how sustainability can be combined with competitiveness,” says Antonio Tajani, European Commission vice president for industry and entrepreneurship. “It will encourage industry to develop alternatives and foster innovation.”

“The substances included in the list, which have been on the table for many years, reflects ongoing discussions by regulatory authorities and industry,” the European Chemical Industry Council (CEFIC) says. “CEFIC provides advice to industry to help understand the science-based process, which we monitor, should they decide to go forward to seek authorization for listed substances,”

Resources
Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/ew4PeA
Excerpts courtesy of  http://bit.ly/halUM9
Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/ew4PeA

“Clean air, endangered species bye bye”


Our new Congress needs a check up from the neck up. Please help.

In an unprecedented back-door move to gut our nation’s cornerstone air, water and wildlife protections, last week House Republicans passed spending legislation that would, among many other things:

– Strip the Clean Air Act of its ability to reduce dangerous carbon dioxide pollution;
– Grant Shell and other polluters a free pass to drill in the Arctic; and
– Remove Endangered Species Act protection for the iconic gray wolf.

If the new Congress get its’ way, big polluters will continue to spew unlimited amounts of carbon dioxide into our air, permanently altering our climate.

The EPA’s efforts to curb carbon pollution from power plants, oil refineries and other large sources — just now getting underway — will grind to a halt.

Politicians, not scientists, will remove the majestic gray wolf’s

Endangered Species Act protections, even though the species remains in less than five percent of its historic habitat and its recovery is far from complete.

That’s not all this bill would do. Congress is setting up a showdown, and we have just a few short weeks to convince the Senate to save the Clean Air Act and protect the wolf.

Please take action today.

protect theri right to play and live free

For more information click here


Letter subject: Oppose House Continuing Resolution

Sample letter:

Dear Senator,

I strongly urge you to oppose the House’s continuing resolution (HR 1).

HR 1 is a back-door move to gut our nation’s cornerstone environmental protections through a stop-gap funding measure to keep the government functioning. I am particularly concerned about the following pieces of HR 1:

Last year was the hottest year on record, following the warmest decade on record. But the facts and the impacts of global warming on our health and our environment don’t seem to matter to House members more concerned with polluter profits than Americans’ health and safety.

I oppose HR 1 because it guts the Clean Air Act’s ability to curb dangerous carbon pollution. Updated

Wolf pups could be target in May '09

Clean Air Act safeguards will finally stop big polluters from continuing to dump unlimited amounts of the greenhouse gas pollution that is perilously warming our planet.

A recent nationwide survey by the American Lung Association found overwhelming support among the public for the EPA’s actions under the Clean Air Act and overwhelming opposition to congressional moves to block them.

I oppose HR 1 because it would facilitate Shell drilling in the Arctic without following normal air permitting procedures. HR 1 is nothing but a gift to big polluters.

I oppose HR 1 because it would remove the gray wolf from Endangered Species Act protection. This would be the first time that politicians, not scientists, have been permitted to make such a decision.  Removing protections for wolves would occur even though they remain in less than five percent of their historic habitat and their recovery is far from complete.

I oppose HR 1 because it would undo progress made to curb destructive mountaintop-removal mining. It would stop the EPA from developing standards that list toxic coal ash as hazardous waste; reviewing water pollution issues; completing rules to protect streams from coal waste, and enforcing the Clean Water Act that governs dredge and fill permits required for mountaintop-removal mining.

It would scrap plans for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to create a “climate service” and zero out U.S. funding for the Nobel-Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). And the EPA would not be allowed to even collect data on sources of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas pollutants.

Substantive policy decisions should not be attached to funding legislation, and these are frightening policy decisions for the future of our planet. I urge you and the Senate to scrap HR 1 in its entirety and to make sure that any new spending legislation safeguards our cornerstone environmental and public health protections.



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Smokestacks photo courtesy NASA.


Center for Biological Diversity

Undo progress made to curb destructive mountaintop-removal mining by stopping the EPA from developing standards that list toxic coal ash as hazardous waste, reviewing water pollution issues, completing rules to protect streams from coal waste, and enforcing the Clean Water Act that governs required dredge and fill permits.

– Scrap plans for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to create a “climate service.”

– Zero out U.S. funding for the Nobel-Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

– Stop the EPA from even collecting data on sources of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas pollutants.

If you only make one call to your senator this year, this is the call you should make. Please call your senator today and tell them to scrap the House’s abhorrent continuing resolution. Let them know you oppose any and all cutbacks or delay of Clean Air Act safeguards to curb greenhouse gas pollution, removing Endangered Species Act protection for the wolf, and all other rollbacks of our cornerstone environmental protections.

Call or write your U.S. senator today. Calling is best, but if you can’t call, use the form below to send a letter.

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Smokestacks photo courtesy NASA.


“Chromium 6 in city water health risk”


Dear Nature’s Crusaders Readers,

Take action today!

In December, Environmental Working Group (EWG) published the first national investigation of the suspected carcinogen chromium-6 — also known as hexavalent chromium — in drinking water in 35 cities around the country. Recently, Senators Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., and Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., introduced Senate Bill 79, the Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011.

The Boxer/Feinstein bill would require the Environmental Protection Agency to act within a year to set a safe limit for chromium-6 in drinking water. Your senators need to hear from you today that clean, safe drinking water is crucial.

Click here TODAY to tell your senators to co-sponsor the Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011, introduced by Senators Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein.

EWG supporters like you submitted tap water samples from their communities. This groundbreaking, people-powered report detected chromium-6 in 31 of the 35 city water supplies tested. Even though this report stirred controversy, our findings were confirmed by a number of water utilities’ own testing. Within hours of its release, EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson announced a new plan to help local utilities assess chromium-6 in drinking water nationwide. That’s a good first step. But EPA must go further.

Last week, I testified on our chromium-6 report before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, chaired by Senator Boxer. And I am going to tell you what I told them: we were heartened by and support EPA’s announcement following the release of our report and by its decision to regulate perchlorate, but it is not enough. The Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011 will make sure there is a safe legal limit on chromium-6 in drinking water.

I have had the opportunity to testify in front of Congress many times, but this was the most gratifying. I was able to stand with the EPA and others concerned with ensuring that all Americans have access to safe, clean drinking water. This hearing — and this bill — are a direct result of EWG’s research. “Keep on doing what you’re doing,” Senator Boxer said to me in her concluding comments at the hearing.

We need to keep the momentum going. I’m counting on you to help us — and everyone else who drinks water.

Click here TODAY to tell your senators to co-sponsor the Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011.

Safe, clean drinking water is vital to EWG supporters like you. Don’t let this opportunity pass you by. Take action today.

Sincerely,

Ken Cook
President, EWG Action Fund

“Poo-Gloos are mean pollution eating films”


Hidden under that dark colored igloo-shaped dome Poo-Gloos eat tons of sewage

Saving small towns and cities millions in waste water management, the
pollution-eating, igloo-shaped devices nicknamed Poo-Gloos sit in an unfilled sewage lagoon in Plain City, Utah, before the lagoon is filled. A new study shows the devices, sold under the name Bio-Domes, can clean up sewage as effectively as multimillion-dollar treatment plants, and thus can help small, growing towns and cities save money by using their sewage lagoons for longer periods of time before they need to build expensive sewage treatment plants.

Wastewater treatment in small, rural communities is an important and challenging engineering task. Proper treatment includes disinfection and the removal of unwanted pollutants. Most rural communities rely on wastewater lagoons as their primary method of treatment because they are simple and inexpensive to operate.
Lagoons are large ponds in which sewage is held for a month to a year so that solids settle and sunlight, bacteria, wind and other natural processes clean the water, sometimes with the help of aeration.
But as communities grow and-or pollution discharge requirements become more stringent, typical wastewater lagoons no longer can provide adequate treatment. Until now, the only alternative for these communities was to replace lagoons with mechanical treatment plants, which are expensive to build and operate.
Mechanical plants treat water in 30 days or less, using moving parts to mix and aerate the sewage, speeding the cleanup. They require electricity, manpower and sometimes chemicals.
The device provides a large surface area on which bacteria can grow, providing the microbes with air and a dark environment so they consume wastewater pollutants continuously with minimal competition from algae.
How Poo-Gloos Work
Poo-Gloos use a thriving bacterial biofilm to consume pollutants. Two dozen or more igloo-shaped Poo-Gloos are installed on the bottom of the lagoon, fully submerged and arrayed in rows. Each Poo-Gloo consists of a set of four progressively smaller, plastic domes nested within each other like Russian nesting dolls and filled with plastic packing to provide a large surface area for bacterial growth.
Rings of bubble-release tubes sit at the base of every Poo-Gloo and bubble air up through the cavities between domes. The air exits a hole in the top of each dome. As air moves through the dome, it draws water from the bottom of the lagoon up through the dome and out the top.
Each Poo-Gloo occupies 28 square feet of space on the bottom of a lagoon while creating 2,800 square feet of surface area for bacterial growth. The combination of large surface area, aeration, constant mixing and a dark environment that limits algae make Poo-Gloos capable of consuming pollutants at rates comparable with mechanical plants.
The Study: How Much Poo Can a Poo-Gloo Remove?
Johnson spent time in the wastewater industry before obtaining his master’s and doctoral degrees in civil and environmental engineering. In 2002, he set about developing a product that could be used to retrofit wastewater lagoons easily and inexpensively. After seven years, with the help of fellow professors, graduate students and a lot of laboratory tests, Johnson was ready for his first field test.
Johnson built a pilot unit using a large construction dumpster welded shut so it was water-tight. The container held seven Poo-Gloos. Johnson enlisted the help of Salt Lake’s Central Valley Water Reclamation Facility to test it. The researchers ran multiple tests using untreated wastewater from the plant to determine the extent to which commonly regulated pollutants could be removed from the wastewater before discharge back to the treatment facility.
The study aimed to determine optimal operating conditions for Poo-Gloos and evaluate their performance at different water temperatures, levels of aeration, and sewage volumes and concentrations. The study found the devices consistently achieved high levels of treatment that were affected only slightly by changing water temperatures and aeration levels:
+ Biological oxygen demand – a measure of organic waste in water – was reduced consistently by 85 percent using Poo-Gloos, and by as much as 92 percent.
+ Total suspended solids fell consistently by 85 percent, and by as much as 95 percent.
+ Ammonia levels dropped more than 98 percent with Poo-Gloo treatment in warmer water and, more important, by as much as 93 percent when temperatures dropped below 50 degrees Fahrenheit – conditions that normally slow bacterial breakdown of sewage.
+ Total nitrogen levels fell 68 percent in warmer water and 55 percent in cooler water.
“The removal rates we saw during the pilot test are comparable to removal rates from a rotating biological contactor, which is a commonly used device in mechanical treatment facilities,” Johnson says. “We couldn’t be happier with the performance of the Poo-Gloos.”
Johnson conducted the study with Hua Xu, a postdoctoral fellow in civil and environmental engineering at the University of Utah, and Youngik Choi, a professor of environmental engineering at Dong-A University in South Korea.
Wastewater Compliance Systems obtained an exclusive license from the University of Utah to commercialize Poo-Gloos, so the devices now have been deployed in six states in either full-scale installations or pilot demonstrations. Every installation showed Poo-Gloos provide treatment that meets pollution-control requirements.
Johnson and his team originally nicknamed the devices Poo-Gloos because they are shaped like igloos. But as possible uses began to expand to industries beyond municipal sewage treatment, Wastewater Compliance Systems decided to sell them as Bio-Domes.
From Nevada to Alabama and Wisconsin, Poo-Gloos to the Rescue
”Every day I speak with community officials who need to upgrade their treatment facilities,” says Taylor Reynolds, director of sales for Wastewater Compliance Systems.
“They come to us because they receive an engineering report recommending a $4 million to $10 million mechanical plant project that is impossible for them to pay for with their existing tax base. Not only can our Poo-Gloos or Bio-Domes help communities comply with pollution limits, but most of the projects I quote cost between $150,000 and $500,000, and the operating expenses are a fraction those at a mechanical plant.”
Each Poo-Gloo requires little maintenance and the same amount of electricity as a 75-watt bulb, putting operating costs for Poo-Gloo systems at hundreds of dollars per month rather than thousands, which is typical of mechanical treatment plants. And some communities may operate Poo-Gloos “off-the-grid” by powering them with solar or wind energy systems.
The results of the new study prompted a number of communities to abandon more expensive alternatives in favor of installing Poo-Gloos. These early adopters can be found in the Nevada town of Jackpot in Elko County, Glacier National Park in Montana, and Plain City and Wellsville in Utah.
Wastewater Compliance Systems also has deployed mobile pilot Poo-Gloos in Louisiana, Alabama and Wisconsin so potential customers, engineering firms and regulators can see first-hand how well they work before they commit tax dollars to the new technology.
“We know that small communities have limited budgets,” Reynolds says. “That’s why we developed our mobile pilot units. Even when our technology has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of dollars on an upgrade project, we like to provide our customers with peace of mind in knowing that our products will solve their problems for years to come. ”

Excerpts and Image courtesy of  html  http://bit.ly/fPVGXW

“GMOing the world -rice next to be altered”


German chemical giants Bayer, BASF team up on GM rice (which is genetically poor to begin with) are teaming up to produce genetically modified (GMO) rice seeds, technology than can boost yields (not quality).

GMO rice to you

The aim is to develop and sell hybrid rice seeds with traits enabling yield advances of 10 percent or more over conventional hybrid seeds. The first products are expected to be launched by 2020.
Rice is the world’s largest food crop, with half of the world’s 6.8-billion population consuming at least one meal of it every day.
According the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), an additional 8-10 million tons of rice needs to be produced each year to feed people and keep prices for the cereal at an affordable level, BASF and Bayer said.
Today, global rice production is about 685 million tons.
For many, GMO crops, by which scientists create new strains of plants that do not occur naturally by manipulating genes, are the answer to feeding the world’s rapidly growing population.
But opponents say that these genetically modified organisms (GMOs) can spread and interbreed with other plants, altering Mother Nature.

It is known that these plants are avoided by wildlife which

should tell you what you should do with GMO plants as well.

They also say that their use will increase the control of private companies over agriculture, with 10 corporations already controlling nearly 70 percent of the world seed market, according to pressure group Greenpeace.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of  html  http://bit.ly/h0RROb

Image courtesy of   htm  http://bit.ly/h8yjDX

“Edwards-Trinity Aquifer System at risk from radioactive waste dump”


What are we thinking!
The Edwards-Trinity Aquifer System is in carbonate and clastic rocks of Cretaceous age in a 77,000-square-mile area that extends from southeastern Oklahoma to western Texas (fig. 78). The aquifer system consists of three complexly interrelated aquifers-the Edwards-Trinity, the Edwards, and the Trinity aquifers.  The Edwards-Trinity and the Trinity aquifers are stratigraphically equivalent in part and are hydraulically connected in some places. The Edwards aquifer overlies the Trinity aquifer  and the two aquifers are hydraulically connected where no confining unit separates them. The ground-water flow systems and permeability of the three aquifers are sufficiently different, however, to allow them to be separately mapped and described.

A Texas commission that has no staff or bylaws are attempting to make very substantial changes and rules that would allow low level radioactive waste from the entire country,to be dumped into a the landfill close to a major aquifer that provides water to one-quarter of the country’s irrigated land as well as drinking water to thousands of people. approved rules on Tuesday that pave the way for 36 states to export low-level radioactive waste to a remote landfill along the Texas-New Mexico border.
The 5-2 vote by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Commission came after last-minute legal maneuvering on Monday failed to delay the meeting, environmentalists warned the dump would pollute groundwater and more than 5,000 people commented on the plan.
So much for safe disposal of our nuclear trash.
The site’s owner, Dallas-based Waste Control Specialists, convinced the commission the West Texas landfill was a “secure solution” to permanently dump radioactive waste. Until now, the site has only accepted waste from Texas, Vermont and the federal government.
“We are certainly very pleased and happy,” CEO Bill Lindquist told The Associated Press after the vote in Andrews, Texas.
The rush vote came two days before Vermont’s incoming governor, Peter Shumlin, takes office. The Democrat has openly criticized the plan and had said he would replace the state’s two commissioners with members more in line with his views.
The first phase of construction should be completed by November. In early 2012, the federal dumping section will also be finished, he said.
While the facility will now be able to accept waste from 36 states. Vermont paid $25 million to guarantee 20 percent capacity in the finished dump. Vermont now has only one nuclear facility, but will phase it out in the next 30 to 40 years.
Vermont’s concerns about where to get rid of its waste are shared by other states. In 2008, South Carolina severely curtailed who could send waste to its low-level nuclear dump, shutting down the last major facility that had been accepting the waste. And a battle over burying high-level nuclear waste at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain, a years-long, multimillion dollar project that has suffered a series of setbacks, has created fierce opposition to building additional nuclear facilities.
Opponents argue that until there are viable solutions for dealing with the dangerous radioactive waste, no new plants should be built and the U.S. should instead focus on expanding solar and wind energy. Others, including Obama, believe nuclear energy is a clean, viable alternative to oil.
“You do sense the panic in the marketplace that there’s no place for this stuff to go,” Lindquist said.
Texas Commissioner Bob Wilson has opposed the expansion plans and the rules for some time. He voted against the rules on Tuesday, but largely because he fears the commission is unprepared to deal with the enormity of the task once the 1,340-acre site begins accepting waste from other states. The commission, he said, is largely unfunded, getting $25,000 a year from Vermont and money from Texas only to cover meeting and travel costs. In addition, he fears expanding the importation of waste will interfere with the site’s capacity. He also questions whether it will be as profitable as is being predicted.
“I thought it was premature,” Wilson said.
Trevor Lovell, a spokesman for Public Citizen, one of the most outspoken opponents of the plan, said his group will meet Wednesday to decide the next step, but he said a lawsuit was possible.
“The commission that is moving forward on this has no staff, has no bylaws, and yet they are attempting to make very substantial changes and rules that would allow in radioactive waste from the entire country,” Lovell said. He noted that the landfill is close to a major aquifer that provides water to one-quarter of the country’s irrigated land as well as drinking water to thousands of people.
“We don’t feel that it’s been demonstrated that the landfill is safe,” Lovell said.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of   http://yhoo.it/igaT64
Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/eXqz66
Map courtesy of            http://bit.ly/fi4sX1

“Polar bears -next oil covered species?”


Just wait the next pictures from Alaska could depict polar bears covered in oil.

They could be the next species to fall to oil greed and government blindness.

When you do not learn from past environmental errors like the Gulf of Mexico oil spill apparentely Salizar and the state of Alaska

want to take their chances by opening up part of the Arctic waters to oil drilling!

In lock-step with Bush administration policies already struck down by the courts, first Salazar opened up huge areas of polar bear habitat to

protect theri right to play and live free

offshore oil drilling — despite the devastating spill impacts we saw in the Gulf of Mexico — and then he refused to upgrade the polar bear’s legal status from “threatened” to “endangered.” Withholding full protection from the polar bear gives Salazar an excuse for not stopping fossil fuel pollution from coal-fired power plants that are driving the species extinct.
But with your generous support and our 20-plus years of winning life-saving results for endangered wildlife, the Center will take on Alaska and Salazar at the same time, saving the polar bear and its precious, disappearing habitat.

Just wait the next pictures of polar bears could be the next species to fall to oil greed and government blindness.
When you do not learn from past environmental errors like the Gulf of Mexico oil spill apparentely Salizar wants to take his chances by opening up part of the Arctic waters to oil drilling!
In lock-step with Bush administration policies already struck down by the courts, first Salazar opened up huge areas of polar bear habitat to offshore oil drilling despite the devastating spill impacts we saw in the Gulf of Mexico  and then he refused to upgrade the polar bear’s legal status from “threatened” to “endangered.” Withholding full protection from the polar bear gives Salazar an excuse for not stopping fossil fuel pollution from coal-fired power plants that are driving the species extinct.
At the same time, the state of Alaska is already in court to strip federal protection from the polar bear, but last week it launched a new attack  on the bear’s habitat. It filed a legal notice to strike down the federal government’s designation of a 120-million-acre polar bear reserve along Alaska’s northern coast.
This is the largest imperiled species habitat reserve in history bigger than 48 of the 50 states  and protecting it is essential to the survival of the polar bear.
Your support is needed before the year’s end.

Together you and  the Center  for Biological Diversity we will take on Alaska and Salazar at the same time, saving the polar bear and its precious, disappearing habitat.
Alaska just took its brutal war against the polar bear to a new level.
The state was already in court to strip federal protection from the polar bear, but last week it launched a new attack — on the bear’s habitat. It filed a legal notice to strike down the federal government’s designation of a 120-million-acre polar bear reserve along Alaska’s northern coast.
This is the largest imperiled species habitat reserve in history bigger than 48 of the 50 states and protecting it is essential to the survival of the polar bear.
The Center for Biological Diversity has just a few weeks to prepare to beat back Alaska’s new antiwildlife lawsuit, and we need to raise the funds now to do it. Please, help us save the polar bear and the largest habitat reserve in history:

Please donate today to our Endangered Species Action Fund together we can make a difference.
Resources

Excerpts courtesy of   Center for Biological Diversity

Image courtesy of   Nature’s Crusaders library

“Chilean environmentalists want to save clean water sources and work with industry”


Saving our beautiful water, rivers, streams, lakes and oceans
Plan ahead when you still have high quality water sources -good idea Chile.

Chile’s industrial advancement has been achieved at some cost to the country’s freshwater resources but it’s only now that awareness of the impending crisis has led to calls for action, environmentalist campaigners said.
Chilean environmental campaigners want to use scientific research and a less destructive use of freshwater resources by industry. The Water Footprint Network, a non-profit organization that has headquarters at the University of Twente, Netherlands is trying to guide them.
The Water Footprint Network has been measuring Chile’s water footprint
The quantity of freshwater used in the production of a specific product in about the same way that other organizations have been monitoring the carbon footprint of consumer and industrial activities and measures the direct and indirect water use by industry.
A WFN study found that producing 1 pound of beef required 1,891 gallons of water, while a glass of beer could entail supply of more than 19 gallons of water, mostly on preparing barley for the process. More than 18 gallons of water go behind a tree producing a single apple.
Chilean lobbyists for more intelligent water use said that Chile would need to bring in new legislation to make sure water conservation and a more sensible use of fresh water resources was adhered to.
Several major institutions have already signed up to the Water Footprint Network but an overall government-led strategy is still awaited. The University of Chile, Fundacion Chile, Green Solutions consulting firms, and Concha y Toro, De Martino, and Errazuriz wineries are among institutions that have joined the campaign.

To measure your own water footprint click here.
“The water footprint … calls for companies to rethink the management of water resources,” said Rodrigo Acevedo, project manager of agribusiness at Fundacion Chile, the non-profit foundation and think thank incorporated in 1976 after agreements between the Chilean government and ITT Corporation. The foundation fosters Chilean business and industrial growth through technological innovation and implementation.
Campaigners said that studies under way in Chile could provide critical information about the water usage by specific areas and also provide incentives for the companies to participate in the studies and contribute to more intelligence uses of freshwater resources.
Officials said Chilean exports could benefit from the drive toward a fairer use of freshwater resources.
The Water Footprint Network has previously assessed the impact of industrialization in China, Germany and Britain.
To measure your own water footprint click here.

Resources
Excerpts courtesy    http://bit.ly/cCQ1Te

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/aNTWMF

Image courtesy of   http://bit.ly/9C7QbJ

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