Help save our water


 

Help save our waterways.

Help save our waterways.

Click here

*** Please use the above link to access the list of the Conference Committee members responsible for finalizing the FARRM bill. Please contact as many members as possible before the end of January.

The current FARRM Bill does not make any attempt to conserve water. It does virtually nothing to address water conservation issues. We are seeking to add two sentences, which will enable US agriculture processing facilities to save over 20 Billion Gallons of Water a Year at NO COST TO GOVERNMENT. This would be the most water savings in any industry in the US. In the past 10 years.

Please ADD These 2 Sentences:
Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary of Agriculture shall require the use of water saving devices for hand washing stations and bathroom faucets at animal processing facilities inspected by USDA. Such devices shall automatically shut-off the water flow when hands are moved out of the water stream and shall be proven to reduce cross-contamination caused by touching faucet handles.

Our position is that the water that is wasted by the processing plants wastes belongs to the community. The water came directly from community owned source and drought threatens their water supply. We demand that processing plants take immediate action to reduce the amount of water they waste.

Thank you.

Click here today!

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“2 Thumbs Up Award -757 Imperiled Species protected”


The “Two Thumbs Up Award”  goes to the Center of Biological Diversity and the the US Fish and Wildlife Service and an enlightened federal judge for helping save 757 threatened species. Thank you from Mother Nature and all of us at Nature’s Crusaders.

 

Court Approves Historic Agreement to Speed Endangered Species Act Protection for 757 Imperiled Species

Walrus, Wolverine, Albatross, Fisher, Mexican Gray Wolf, Sage Grouse,
Golden Trout Among Those Fast-tracked for Protection

TUCSON, Ariz.— A federal judge today approved a landmark legal agreement between the Center for Biological Diversity and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service requiring the agency to make initial or final decisions on whether to add hundreds of imperiled plants and animals to the federal endangered species list by 2018. The court also approved an agreement with another conservation group that it had previously blocked based on legal opposition from the Center.

“The court’s approval today will allow this historic agreement to move forward, speeding protection for as many as 757 of America’s most imperiled species,” said Noah Greenwald, endangered species director at the Center. “The historic agreement gives species like the Pacific walrus, American wolverine and California golden trout a shot at survival.”

The Center wrote scientific listing petitions and/or filed lawsuits to protect the 757 species as part of its decade-long campaign to safeguard 1,000 of America’s most imperiled, least protected species. Spanning every taxonomic group, the species protected by the agreement include 26 birds, 31 mammals, 67 fish, 22 reptiles, 33 amphibians, 197 plants and 381 invertebrates.

“With approval of the agreement, species from across the nation will be protected,” said Greenwald. “Habitat destruction, climate change, invasive species and other factors are pushing species toward extinction in all 50 states, and this agreement will help turn the tide.”

Individual species included in the agreement include the walrus, wolverine, Mexican gray wolf, New England cottontail rabbit, three species of sage grouse, scarlet Hawaiian honeycreeper (‘i‘iwi), California golden trout and Rio Grande cutthroat trout — as well as 403 southeastern river-dependent species, 42 Great Basin springsnails and 32 Pacific Northwest mollusks.

The agreement, formalized today with the judge’s approval, was signed by the Center and the Fish and Wildlife Service on July 12. Already dozens of species have been proposed for listing, including the Miami blue butterfly, one of the rarest butterflies in the United States.

While the agreement encompasses nearly all the species on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s official list of “candidates” for Endangered Species Act protection, two-thirds of the species in the agreement (499) are not on the list. This corresponds with the conclusion of numerous scientists and scientific societies that the extinction crisis is vastly greater than existing federal priority systems and budgets.

“The Endangered Species Act specifically allows scientists, conservationists and others to submit petitions to protect species,” said Greenwald. “These petitions play a critical role in identifying species in need and help the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service with the ever-expanding task of protecting species threatened with extinction.”

The species in the agreement occur in all 50 states and several Pacific island territories. The top three states in the agreement are Alabama, Georgia and Florida, with 149, 121 and 115 species respectively. Hawaii has 70, Nevada 54, California 51, Washington 36, Arizona 31, Oregon 24, Texas 22 and New Mexico 18.

An interactive map and a full list of the 757 species broken down by state, taxonomy, name and schedule of protection are available here.

Highlighted species are below.

Species Highlights

American wolverine: A bear-like carnivore, the American wolverine is the largest member of the weasel family. It lives in mountainous areas of the West, where it depends on late-spring snowpacks for denning. The primary threats to its existence are shrinking snowpacks related to global warming, excessive trapping and harassment by snowmobiles.

The Center for Biological Diversity and allies petitioned to list the wolverine as an endangered species in 1994. It was placed on the candidate list in 2010. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2013 and finalize the decision in 2014 if warranted.

Pacific walrus: A large, ice-loving, tusk-bearing pinniped, the Pacific walrus plays a major role in the culture and religion of many northern peoples. Like the polar bear, it is threatened by the rapid and accelerating loss of Arctic sea ice and oil drilling.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list it as an endangered species in 2007. It was placed on the candidate list in 2011. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2017 and finalize the decision in 2018 if warranted.

Mexican gray wolf: Exterminated from, then reintroduced to the Southwest, the Mexican gray wolf lives in remote forests and mountains along the Arizona-New Mexico border. It is threatened by legal and illegal killing, which has hampered the federal recovery program, keeping the species down to 50 wild animals.

The Center for Biological Diversity and allies petitioned to list it as an endangered species separate from other wolves in 2009. It is not on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2012 and finalize the decision in 2013 if warranted.

Black-footed albatross: A large, dark-plumed seabird that lives in northwestern Hawaii, the black-footed albatross is threatened by longline swordfish fisheries, which kill it as bycatch.

The Center for Biological Diversity and allies petitioned to list this albatross as an endangered species in 2004. It is not on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose it for protection, determine it does not qualify, or find that it is warranted but precluded for protection in 2011.

Rio Grande cutthroat trout: Characterized by deep crimson slashes on its throat — hence the name “cutthroat” — the Rio Grande cutthroat is New Mexico’s state fish. It formerly occurred throughout high-elevation streams in the Rio Grande Basin of New Mexico and southern Colorado. Logging, road building, grazing, pollution and exotic species have pushed it to the brink of extinction.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list it as an endangered species in 1998. It was placed on the candidate list in 2008. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2014 and finalize the decision in 2015 if warranted.

403 Southeast aquatic species: The southeastern United States contains the richest aquatic biodiversity in the nation, harboring 62 percent of the country’s fish species (493 species), 91 percent of its mussels (269 species) and 48 percent of its dragonflies and damselflies (241 species). Unfortunately the wholesale destruction, diversion, pollution and development of the Southeast’s rivers have made the region America’s aquatic extinction capital.

In 2010, the Center for Biological Diversity completed a 1,145-page, peer-reviewed petition to list 403 Southeast aquatic species as endangered, including the Florida sandhill crane, MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow, Alabama map turtle, Oklahoma salamander, West Virginia spring salamander, Tennessee cave salamander, Black Warrior waterdog, Cape Sable orchid, clam-shell orchid, Florida bog frog, Lower Florida Keys striped mud turtle, eastern black rail and streamside salamander.

Only 18 of Southeast aquatic species are on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will issue initial listing decisions on all 403 plants and animals in 2011.

Pacific fisher: A cat-like relative of minks and otters, the fisher is the only animal that regularly preys on porcupines. It lives in old-growth forests in California, Oregon and Washington, where it is threatened by logging.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list the fisher as an endangered species in 2000. It was placed on the candidate list in 2004. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2014 and finalize the decision in 2015 if warranted.

Cactus ferruginous pygmy owl: A tiny desert raptor, active in the daytime, the cactus ferruginous pygmy owl lives in southern Arizona and northern Mexico. It is threatened by urban sprawl and nearly extirpated from Arizona.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list it as an endangered species in 1992. It was protected in 1997, then delisted on technical grounds in 2006. The Center repetitioned to protect it in 2007. It is not on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2011 and finalize the decision in 2012 if warranted.

42 Great Basin springsnails: Living in isolated springs of the Great Basin and Mojave deserts, springsnails play important ecological roles cycling nutrients, filtering water and providing food to other animals. Many are threatened by a Southern Nevada Water Authority plan to pump remote, desert groundwater to Las Vegas.

In 2009, the Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list 42 springsnails as endangered species, including the duckwater pyrg, Big Warm Spring pyrg and Moapa pebblesnail. None are on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will issue initial listing decisions on all 42 species in 2011.

Scarlet Hawaiian honeycreeper (Iiwi): This bright-red bird hovers like a hummingbird and has long been featured in the folklore and songs of native Hawaiians. It is threatened by climate change, which is causing mosquitoes that carry introduced diseases — including avian pox and malaria — to move into the honeycreeper’s higher-elevations refuges. It has been eliminated from low elevations on all islands by these diseases.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list it as an endangered species in 2010. It is not on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2016 and finalize the decision in 2017 if warranted.

Ashy storm petrel: A small, soot-colored seabird that lives off coastal waters from California to Baja, Mexico, the ashy storm petrel looks like it’s walking on the ocean surface when it feeds. It is threatened by warming oceans, sea-level rise and ocean acidification.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list it as an endangered species in 2007. It is not on the candidate list. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2013 and finalize the decision in 2014 if warranted.

Greater and Mono Basin sage grouse: Sage grouse are showy, ground-dwelling birds that perform elaborate mating dances, with males puffing up giant air sacks on their chests. The Mono Basin sage grouse lives in Nevada and California. The greater sage grouse lives throughout much of the Interior West. Both are threatened by oil and gas drilling, livestock grazing, development and off-road vehicles.

The Center for Biological Diversity and allies petitioned to list the Mono Basin sage grouse as an endangered species in 2005. It was placed on the candidate list in 2010. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2013 and finalize the decision in 2014 if warranted.

The greater sage grouse was petitioned for listing in 2002 and placed on the candidate list in 2010. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2015 and finalize the decision in 2016 if warranted.

Miami blue butterfly: An ethereal beauty native to South Florida and possibly the most endangered insect in the United States, the Miami blue

was thought extinct after Hurricane Andrew in 1992 but rediscovered in 1999. It is threatened by habitat loss and pesticide spraying.

It was petitioned for listing as an endangered species in 2000 and placed on the candidate list in 2005. The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to list it on an emergency basis in 2011. Under the agreement, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was required to propose it for protection (or determine it does not qualify) in 2012 and finalize the decision in 2013 if warranted. In August, the agency protected the butterfly on an emergency basis. 

Oregon spotted frog: The Oregon spotted frog lives in wetlands from southernmost British Columbia through Washington and Oregon to northernmost California. It is threatened by habitat destruction and exotic species.

 

Press release provided by The Center for Biological Diversity http://goo.gl/DlFGk

Image courtesy of  http://goo.gl/bl00h

Image Ca. Golden trout courtesy of dfg.ca.gov http://goo.gl/1nNls

Image Pacific walrus courtesy of farnorthscience.com  http://goo.gl/P6MJE

Image Miami Blue butterfly courtesy of dep.state.fl.us  http://goo.gl/nTRNf

Image Oregon spotted frog courtesy of blm.gov  http://goo.gl/Cin8a

“Chromium 6 in city water health risk”


Dear Nature’s Crusaders Readers,

Take action today!

In December, Environmental Working Group (EWG) published the first national investigation of the suspected carcinogen chromium-6 — also known as hexavalent chromium — in drinking water in 35 cities around the country. Recently, Senators Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., and Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., introduced Senate Bill 79, the Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011.

The Boxer/Feinstein bill would require the Environmental Protection Agency to act within a year to set a safe limit for chromium-6 in drinking water. Your senators need to hear from you today that clean, safe drinking water is crucial.

Click here TODAY to tell your senators to co-sponsor the Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011, introduced by Senators Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein.

EWG supporters like you submitted tap water samples from their communities. This groundbreaking, people-powered report detected chromium-6 in 31 of the 35 city water supplies tested. Even though this report stirred controversy, our findings were confirmed by a number of water utilities’ own testing. Within hours of its release, EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson announced a new plan to help local utilities assess chromium-6 in drinking water nationwide. That’s a good first step. But EPA must go further.

Last week, I testified on our chromium-6 report before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, chaired by Senator Boxer. And I am going to tell you what I told them: we were heartened by and support EPA’s announcement following the release of our report and by its decision to regulate perchlorate, but it is not enough. The Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011 will make sure there is a safe legal limit on chromium-6 in drinking water.

I have had the opportunity to testify in front of Congress many times, but this was the most gratifying. I was able to stand with the EPA and others concerned with ensuring that all Americans have access to safe, clean drinking water. This hearing — and this bill — are a direct result of EWG’s research. “Keep on doing what you’re doing,” Senator Boxer said to me in her concluding comments at the hearing.

We need to keep the momentum going. I’m counting on you to help us — and everyone else who drinks water.

Click here TODAY to tell your senators to co-sponsor the Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011.

Safe, clean drinking water is vital to EWG supporters like you. Don’t let this opportunity pass you by. Take action today.

Sincerely,

Ken Cook
President, EWG Action Fund

“Snowflakes complex crystals of ice” -NC Holiday Wonders #3


The direction, shape and size of snowflakes depend on a balance between faceting and branching.  Faceting tends to make simple flat surfaces, while branching tends to make more complex structures. This is an image of a complex branching  multifaceted snowflake called a dendrite snowflake.

Mother Nature and Nature’s Crusaders wishes  you a peaceful eco- holiday season and New Year!

Holiday Wonders series from Nature’s Crusaders showcases the beauty of Mother Nature’s Wonders.

This image is graciously provided for your wonder and amazement by National Geographic.

“Bombing the moon for water !! “


The LCROSS mission was designed to bomb two spots in a crater on the surface of the moon’s south pole to search for water. These impacts created craters by throwing tons of debris and potentially water ice and vapor above the lunar surface. The impact released materials from the lunar surface that were analyzed for the presence of hydrated minerals to tell researchers if water is there or not.

The Shepherding Spacecraft (SS) and Centaur rocket were launched together with another spacecraft called the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). All three were connected to each other for launch, about one hour after launch, the LRO separated. The SS guided the Centaur rocket through multiple Earth orbits, each taking about 38 days.
Next the rocket separated from the SS hit the moon’s surface going more than twice the speed of a bullet. A large plume or cloud of lunar debris could be seen. As the plume rose, the SS’s cameras, took pictures of the rocket’s descent and impact into the moon and its other instruments analyzed the material . Four minutes later, the SS followed almost the exact same path as the rocket, descending down through the plume and analyzing it for water (ice and vapor), hydrocarbons and hydrated materials.

In comparison, the sands of the African Sahara are 2 to 5 percent water, and the water is tightly bound to the minerals. In the lunar crater, which lies in perpetual darkness, the water is in the form of almost pure ice grains mixed in with the rest of the soil, and is easy to extract. The ice is about 5.6 percent of the mixture, and possibly as high as 8.5 percent of it, Dr. Colaprete, the Principal Investigator for the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing (LCROSS) mission said.

When was the scientific principal of respecting new lands and environments, disturbing as little as possible abandoned?

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of   http://nyti.ms/cRTVML
Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/bKcwV8
Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/cEHo4O

Image courtesy of    http://bit.ly/91ONWj

“Saving Lancaster Sound from effects of sonar testing”


A Canadian judge (Bless her.) Sunday told researchers they can’t bombard the arctic waters of Lancaster Sound with sound waves to try to learn what’s under the seabed.

Nunavut Judge Sue Cooper granted an injunction sought by parties seeking to stop the joint project of the federal natural resources department and the German Alfred Wegner Institute for Polar and Marine Research, the Toronto Sun reported. The seismic project was to have started as early as this week, the newspaper said.
The researchers intended to map the area under Lancaster Sound by bouncing sound waves off the earth below the sea.
Some of the general known effects of sound waves include:
Damage to rocket engines, hence the flood of water under the space shuttle to absorb the sound vibration at engine start.
It has been proposed as a source of cold fusion in heavy water.

It is used to atomize fuel in burners.

it is used to break up gallstones.

Can cause damage to eardrums and living tissues in vitro and in vivo.

So when scientists want to use sonar/sound waves to map Lancaster Sounds seabed without having a clue of what damage they could cause some knowing folks objected.

While two Nunavut government agencies had given their OK to go ahead with the sonic testing, some Inuit groups and environmentalists went to court, contending it could harm marine wildlife.
Judge Cooper sided with the testing opponents, saying there could be an impact on wildlife and consequently on the food supply of the nearby Inuit communities.
“On the whole of the evidence presented, I am satisfied that Inuit in the five affected communities will suffer irreparable harm if an injunction is not granted,” her decision reads.
The importance of Lancaster Sound, an arm of Baffin Bay should not be underrated. It is a major passage through the Arctic Archipelago, is 248.55 miles (400 km) long and some 62.14 miles (100 km) wide. It lies at the north end of Baffin Island and is connected to Barrow Strait on the west. As a result of the interaction of currents, the sound is rich in nutrients and supports a biologically varied community of birds, mammals and fish. At Bylot Island, which lies at its eastern end, it provides breeding grounds for some 3 million seabirds alone. The area has provided sustenance for Inuit cultures for thousands of years: ringed seals, walrus and polar bears, and Narwhals, Belugas, killer and bowhead whales. Arctic fox is trapped in almost every inlet, and arctic char is taken at the mouths of rivers.

“Thank you for protecting Mother Nature Judge Sue Cooper”

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of    http://bit.ly/axZTvaTva
Excerpts courtesy of   http://yhoo.it/cnCGDO

Image courtesy of   http://bit.ly/bDkrbi

“Blue holes in the Bahamas – keys to origins of life?”


A sense of danger and intrigue fill the divers as they descend into the unusual waters of  the blue hole.

“Fifty feet from the surface looms a pale haze, less smoky than fibrous, like a silvery net of faint, swirling cobwebs hovering motion­less in the darkness. It’s a layer of hydrogen sulfide, a toxic gas created by bacterial colonies and decaying organic matter. Divers entering the gas may experience itching skin, tingling, or dizziness; some smell rotten eggs as it penetrates their skin and metabolizes through their lungs. is a submarine cave or underwater sinkhole. They are also called vertical caves.”

There are many different blue holes located around the world, from Belize and the Bahamas to the Red Sea.Blue holes are roughly circular, steep-walled depressions formed during the last ice age. The center of the hole is deep filled with dark blue waters and surrounded by the lighter blue of the shallows. Their water circulation is poor, so oxygen supply is low so most sea life is low, but large numbers of bacteria can easily thrive in this environment.

The deepest blue hole in the world at 202 meters (663 ft) is Dean’s Blue Hole, located in a bay west of Clarence Town on Long Island, Bahamas.

Scientists now think these blue holes may hold

Check out the beautiful blue hole images  at National Geographic Magazine online.

Reference

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/aFLAU3

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/9fhlZA

Image courtesy of     http://bit.ly/cmaY0A

“Polar bears win one -now after big oil”


The ruling is a huge victory for polar bears, bowhead whales, other Arctic wildlife and tens of thousands of NRDC supporters like you who enabled us to go to court and fight off Big Oil’s planned invasion of this sensitive habitat.
A federal court has just halted oil and gas companies from moving ahead with drilling operations in

We win a big one!

millions of acres spanning Alaska’s Chukchi Sea  one of our nation’s two “Polar Bear Seas.

Beginning with the Bush administration a massive sell of drilling rights in the Chukchi Sea was initiated, opening the door for a oil rush into the heart of the bear’s melting sea ice habitat.

 NRDC, The Center for Biological Diversity, EarthJustice and Alaska Native groups and other conservationists sued.
A federal judge has agreed  has put a hold on the sale of rights and told the Obama administration to get a more science-based approach to protecting America’s endangered Arctic. Don’t let the Gulf spill happen again in Alaska.

It could be catastrophic for polar bears and other wildlife.

The oil industry has no technology for cleaning up oil in broken sea ice — one of the main places where polar bears search for food. And oil-covered polar bears have almost no chance of

First and foremost, we are still waging our legal fight to stop the Shell oil company from drilling off the coast of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in the Beaufort Sea — the second of the two Polar Bear Seas.
We will continue fighting Shell and any other company that targets the polar bear’s home for P.S. If you want to help build on the momentum of this victory, please make a special donation today that will enable us to carry the fight to Shell and other oil companies that threaten the polar bear’s home.

“Thank you” from the wildlife in Alaska, Mother Nature, NC and all the environmental groups and individuals involved.
Resources

Excerpts courtesy of   NRDC.com

Image courtesy of  http://bit.ly/dosAyR

“4 oil breaks in 3 months toxic soup increasing- why?”


Well, terorists could not destroy our environment faster than we are doing. For the the fourth time in three months crude oil is gushing into our waterways killing our wildlife and contaminating our water.

In the Gulf of Mexico yesterday the third pipe to rip open thanks to negligence.

Homeland Security director for Jefferson Parish, La., that there is a new spout of oil  has sprung up in the Gulf of Mexico after a boat struck an oil well in the early morning hours on July 27, 2010.
A work boat crashed into the well sending oil spewing 20 feet in the air from the severed 4-inch pipe near Bayou St. Dennis, La., shearing off its valve structure and releasing pressurized natural gas and light oil.
Cleanup workers are currently booming off the area and the scene at sea has been taken over by federal agents. The U.S. Coast Guard, Jefferson Parish police and fire officials, as well as Vessels of Opportunity boats have all been sent to the scene.
Federal officials do not know who owns the well, but a contractor who handles wild wells was on the way. How can that be that wells are not marked with identification to tell who owns them? Even illegals must carry some form of identification!

Now yet another break in a pipe

This one is in one of Lake Michigan’s feeder rivers  on Tuesday. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which has taken control of efforts to contain and clean up the Kalamazoo River spill. It is believed to have poured more than 1 million gallons of oil into Talmadge Creek, which feeds the river. Enbridge Inc., the Canadian company that oversees the pipeline says they will compensate the state and families for their losses, but have put no dollar figure to its claim.

Compounding the problem of clean up like Louisiana, the State of Michigan and the EPA is overseeing the clean-up, have no  trained cleanup workers for this type of disaster.
This crude oil had traveled at least 35 miles downstream from where it leaked in Calhoun County’s Marshall Township, killing fish, coating other wildlife and emitting a strong, unpleasant toxic odor. It had passed through Battle Creek, a city of 52,000 residents about 110 miles west of Detroit, and was headed toward Morrow Lake, a key point near a Superfund site upstream of Kalamazoo, the largest city in the region. Lake Michigan is only  80 miles away, and many summer vacation homes and communities drink, swim and fish from that water source.

Both BP and Enbridge Inc. have been cited for numerous violations in the past, but no one group or previous administrations have help oil companies accountable for safety and health, care and maintenance of their equipment, the environment or our water and food supply.

Gross oversight, greed, lack of accountability and the lack of involvement of the American public has created this mess. Will you act to save our environment and us – today?

Tell the Senate to vote for Clean Energy and Accountability.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of http://yhoo.it/aTebiy

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/aTTEKi

To help clean up our waterways http://susty.com/living-lands-and-waters-organization/

“Looping intermingling deep currents may determine ice age”


Radiocarbon data taken from 30 sediment cores at various locations in the North Pacific indicate that the earth’s climate is regulated largely by the world ocean’s circulation.

This density-driven loops of currents brings warm surface water to the polar regions and transports cold water away. As poleward flowing salty waters cool in the North Atlantic, they become so heavy that they sink. This sinking acts as a pump for the ocean’s conveyor belt circulation.

In the past the North Atlantic branch of the conveyor belt circulation was shut down by melting ice sheets, which in turn released so much fresh glacial meltwater that the sinking of cold water in the Nordic Seas stopped and the Northern Hemisphere was plunged into a deep freeze around 17,000 years ago

This icy deep water spilled out of the subarctic North Pacific at depths of 2000-3000 meters (6,561.7 – 9,842.5 feet) merged into a southward flowing deep western boundary current with a warm, strong poleward current formed at the surface. These conjoining currents gave off lots of heat into the atmosphere.

The deep churning flow of water in the Pacific may have stirred up old carbon-rich deep waters,which would also increase the atmospheric CO2 concentration further warming and accelerated the glacial meltdown.

A computer “earth system model” was run under conditions that mimicked the catastrophic meltwater discharge from the retreating ice sheets 17,500 – 15,000 years ago and disrupted the heat The North Pacific Ocean served as a kind of global backup generator to partly offset There are many complex changes that took place in the oceans of the world during these periods of climate change.

Resources

Excerpts and Image courtesy of   http://bit.ly/9mD3CY



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