Impact of oil on biodiversity

We live in the web of energy . Walk softly but love all.
Making a difference and follow your passion for some living thing, the environment, sea life, insects, gardening, bees, air quality, Artic refuge, fireflies, improving life in any form will help everyone.

Every man, woman student and child should vote for being healthier, living softer with others and with Mother Nature. Look at the opportunities we have to make life better.
If you dedicate yourself to cleaning up just one of the following all of nature, people, oceans, wildlife and air quality will improve. Join with us at Nature’s Crusaders.
Look how our oil guzzling has effects our harbors and people and land around it.

Pipeline over the Artic

“Jutting out of the sparkling snowfield, the exploratory oil rig is crammed with pipes, platforms and state-of-the-art computer gear. A crew in hard hats, wrestling with a huge vertical pipe moving in and out of the ground, is shouting above the constant clang.

It looks like a regular rig but sits on a thick pad of ice, doing minimal damage to the tender tundra, according to its operator, Phillips Alaska, which opened the 300 million-barrel field near Prudhoe Bay in November.

In the summer, the ice will melt and only an 8-foot pipe will be left sticking out, said oil engineer Mark St. Amour, at work on the rig. There won’t even be a permanent road to the site, and the herds of wildlife that swarm over the region during the thaw will barely know it’s there. Or so Phillips says.

With a significant spill last month at Phillips’ nearby Kuparuk field focusing attention on the perils of drilling on Alaska’s North Slope, the company hopes that the new techniques in use at Alpine will quiet environmentalists’ fears that oil exploration will forever blemish the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to the east.”Jutting out of the sparkling snowfield, the exploratory oil rig is crammed with pipes, platforms and state-of-the-art computer gear. A crew in hard hats, wrestling with a huge vertical pipe moving in and out of the ground, is shouting above the constant clang.

It looks like a regular rig but sits on a thick pad of ice, doing minimal damage to the tender tundra, according to its operator, Phillips Alaska, which opened the 300 million-barrel field near Prudhoe Bay in November.

In the summer, the ice will melt and only an 8-foot pipe will be left sticking out, said oil engineer Mark St. Amour, at work on the rig. There won’t even be a permanent road to the site, and the herds of wildlife that swarm over the region during the thaw will barely know it’s there. Or so Phillips says.

With a significant spill last month at Phillips’ nearby Kuparuk field focusing attention on the perils of drilling on Alaska’s North Slope, the company hopes that the new techniques in use at Alpine will quiet environmentalists’ fears that oil exploration will forever blemish the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to the east. Jutting out of the sparkling snowfield, the exploratory oil rig is crammed with pipes, platforms and state-of-the-art computer gear. A crew in hard hats, wrestling with a huge vertical pipe moving in and out of the ground, is shouting above the constant clang.

It looks like a regular rig but sits on a thick pad of ice, doing minimal damage to the tender tundra, according to its operator, Phillips Alaska, which opened the 300 million-barrel field near Prudhoe Bay in November.

In the summer, the ice will melt and only an 8-foot pipe will be left sticking out, said oil engineer Mark St. Amour, at work on the rig. There won’t even be a permanent road to the site, and the herds of wildlife that swarm over the region during the thaw will barely know it’s there. Or so Phillips says.

With a significant spill last month at Phillips’ nearby Kuparuk field focusing attention on the perils of drilling on Alaska’s North Slope, the company hopes that the new techniques in use at Alpine will quiet environmentalists’ fears that oil exploration will forever blemish the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to the east. http://www.baltimoresun.com/topic/bal-te.alaska08may08,0,5906213.story

Artic Wilderness
Use less oil walk leave the car at home. To gain only 1% more oil some wayward souls want to drill and devastate another 2ooo miles of tundra! Here is a map from the NRDC showing what the drilling rigs would look like on the landscape.

Map http://www.nrdc.org/land/wilderness/arcticmap_2000acres.pdf

Looks are just a small part of the problem because the left over wastes from drill has to go somewhere so it will pollute the land, waters and animal and delicate plant life balance in an area that is all ready strongly challenged by global warming.

“It would take 10 years for any Arctic Refuge oil to reach the market, and even when production peaks — in the distant year of 2027 — the refuge would produce a paltry 3 percent of Americans’ daily consumption. The U.S. government’s own Energy Information Agency recently reported that drilling in the Arctic would save less than 4 cents per gallon in 20 years.” -NRDC

In the past Congress and the American people have voted to keep this wilderness area pristine let us keep it that way forever.

-Mother Nature October 30, 2008

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